TENSES – The Past

It’s been a while since I mentioned writing some grammar articles on the English tenses, but I’m finally back into (some sort of) a routine. Today, I’ll be discussing the past tense. If you’d like to read up on the introduction again before diving into this one, you can find it here.

The Past Tense

The past tense is used when we write about what happened before now, what happened right up until now, and what happened right up until now and is still happening.

The past tense can be divided into:

  • the simple past
  • the  past continuous
  • the past perfect
  • the past perfect continuous

Simple Past

Use when:

  • an action has happened once in the past
  • an action happened repeatedly in the past
  • an action was true for some time in the past
  • the word ‘ago’ is used in the sentence.

The action could have happened once, never, or several times, but both the beginning and the end of the action(s) lie in the past.

Form: verb root + -ed

Example: I worked all night to finish the chapter.

Example: He attended several workshops on writing.

Example: We lived there for years.

Example: It was a long time ago when she kissed him for the first time.

Signal or Key words:

Often Always Sometimes
Last (time frame; day, week, etc.) When Yesterday
(period of time) ago The other day In (year)

Past Continuous / Progressive

Use when:

  • an action was happening before, during, and after another action or specific time in the past
  • an action is interrupted by another action
  • an action was happening for a while in the past
  • an action happened repeatedly in the past
  • an action was evolving/growing in the past
  • you want to indicate a change of mind in the past
  • two actions happened at the same time in the past
  • (you are wondering about something)

When you are wondering about something, you use the past continuous, but it is not a true time on the time line.

Form: was/were + verb root + -ing

Example: He was lying in the grass when he had an epiphany.

Example: I was writing a paranormal novel when I was asked to write an article on grammar.

Example: She was working on that book for ages.

Example: He was reading to us every night.

Example: Their grasp of the English language was improving.

Example: We were thinking about entering a writers’ competition, but we don’t think we’re good enough.

Example: I was writing while he was making dinner.

Example: (I was wondering if you could help me with my grammar.)

Signal or Key words:

While When

Past Perfect

Use when:

  • an action happened before another action or specific time in the past
  • an action happened before and up until another action in the past (example: live, work, teach, study)
  • using reported speech
  • (using if)

It is possible to use the simple past instead of the past perfect if ‘before’ or ‘after’ is used in the sentence to indicate the time the action happened.

You can’t use the past perfect if there is no specific time indication.

Form: had + past participle (= verb root + ed)

Example: She had always walked to work until she had the accident.

 Example: He had lived in a student flat for years until he got his first job.

 Example: I had thought her to be helpful before, but she wasn’t.

 Example: (If he had worked harder, he would have finished his novel by now.)

Signal or Key words:

When After Before
By the time Already Just
Never Not yet Until … (in the past)

Past Perfect Continuous / Progressive

Use when:

  • an action began at a certain time in the past and continued up until another specific time in the past
  • showing cause of an action (using ‘because’)
  • using reported speech
  • (using if)

Form: had been + present participle

Example: I had been buying books in the book store when I discovered online stores.

Example: She had been working all night because she didn’t work enough hours before.

Example: I had been reading my book before I looked up to see him standing there.

Example: (If he had been paying attention, he would have gotten there faster.)

Signal or Key words:

For Since

Next week, I’ll be discussing the present tense.

Tenses_Graph

Meet The Author… Jay Raven

Birmingham-based Jay Raven has written multiple horror/fantasy short stories which were published in many anthologies. He is an author with multiple books under his name, not all of them in the horror genre. Jay has been in the writing world for a while, as a journalist at first but now as a full-time novel writer. Let’s get to know Jay a bit better.

Jay Raven

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Tell us a little about yourself…

I have passion for all things horror, especially vampires. As a teenager I’d skip school to sneak into the cinema to watch Peter Cushing staking Christopher Lee.

I’ve been a full-time fiction writer for 25 years, widely published on both sides of the Atlantic, but it was only a few years ago that I began to focus on my dark fantasy output. Most of my stories are set in the past – I jokily label it “harpsichord horror”.

In my free time I do a lot of baking, although I’m not sure the description free time is strictly accurate as that’s when I dream up my best plots.

What is the most exciting thing that has ever happened to you?

Just before Christmas I was signed up by Junction Publishing to write two Gothic horror/dark fantasy novels. It’s since become a three-book deal.

What is your favorite childhood book, and why?

Alice in Wonderland. Even as a child I loved its creepy, menacing atmosphere, laced with barely controlled mayhem.

How has your environment and upbringing colored your writing?

I grew up in Glasgow which had more than its fair share of Victorian grave robbers in its past. The cemetery near us had a small building where relatives would stand guard through the night to protect their newly buried loved ones. Learning about that made a huge impact on me.

Jay_Raven_StorybookWhat was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

While still at school I used to write local history pieces for my local newspaper. One was a three-part reconstruction of a notorious murder of a foreman by gangers building the railway between Glasgow and Edinburgh. My articles documented the manhunt to bring the killers to justice and the resulting public executions.

Just after part two appeared I was taking a shortcut home from my girlfriend’s house and I bumped into the school bully in the dark. I thought he was going to beat me up, but instead he was all excited and in awe, demanding to know what happened to the killers in the final installment.

Who is your favorite author? How much is your work influenced by his or her works?

Michael Crichton, author of best-sellers Jurassic Park and WestWorld amongst others. His writing is so tight, pacy and cleverly structured that it leaves you breathless. There isn’t a wasted word, character or scene. He is a master storyteller. I try to make my writing just as fast-paced and lean.

Music or silence?

I write with earphones on, music pumping. It blocks all external distractions and helps inspire me. You could say that my stories are created with their own soundtracks.   

Do you outline or just write?

Before I begin a book I spend two weeks creating a highly detailed blueprint – every chapter, scene, major hook, key pieces of dialogue all go into it and I end up with a 30-page mini version of the novel, which I just need to flesh out.

If you didn’t write, what would you do for work?

I’d bake artisan cakes in the shape of coffins and sell them at Dracula events in Whitby.

Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym, and if yes, why?

Jay_Raven_MiddleofNowhereI already do. Jay Raven is the name I use for my dark fantasy work. I write humour under my real name. I try to keep both sides completely separate. As Ghostbusters advises: “Top safety tip. Don’t cross the streams!”

What is your writing style?

I concentrate on making the work as visual as possible. I want readers to forget they’re reading and imagine themselves watching a movie. I inhabit the boundary between horror and fantasy. My work relies more on suspense than gore.

Do you try to be original in your storytelling or to deliver to readers what they want?

I try to do both – I obey the rules of the genre but mix in loads of new elements to keep things fresh. In Blood Riders, for instance, my vampires have demon horses and can communicate with each telepathically.

Do you have any difficulty writing characters of the opposite sex?

No, I started out writing short stories for women’s magazines. That’s something many people would be surprised about.

Out of the protagonists you’ve written about so far, which one do you feel you relate to the most?

Anton Yoska, the marshal caught up in the jailhouse siege, is an idealised version of me. But where he is brooding, I am just moody. He is noble and high minded, I come across simply as pompous.

What do your plans for future projects include?

Jay_Raven_ToSnareAWitchWitch Hunt – a series of whodunits set in an alternative history (1930s) where a Russian empire warlock is a homicide detective investigating murders that involve supernatural elements.

What writing wisdom would you bestow upon new writers?

Write the kind of books you would want to read, don’t slavishly try to recreate what is currently hot!

How do author friends help you become a better writer?

I kick about ideas with my fellow writers. They see things from a different angle, and are brutally honest  – which is exactly what you need.

What has been the best compliment?

A magazine editor who paid handsomely for my first short story said – “Love this – do you have any more?”

What do your fans mean to you?

Everything. Their support makes it all worthwhile.

Can you give us a bit more about your latest book, Crimson Siege (Blood Riders – Book 1) as it is launched today, the 22nd of May 2018?

 

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When ruthless bounty hunters target one of 19th century Europe’s most feared vampire clans, the last place any lawman wants to be is caught in the middle…


But for Anton Yoska, Lord Marshal of the Imperial lands south of the Carpathian Mountains, fate has trapped him in a supernatural stand-off that can end only in terror, pain and destruction.
A gang of mercenaries led by Anton’s former army comrade Milosh Drubrick have captured vampire aristocrat Stefan Modjeski, wanted for a string of bloody ritualistic murders, and have come to Anton to claim the reward and seek shelter and protection. And as Stefan’s predatory undead kin lay siege to the jailhouse, Anton is faced with an agonising choice – hand over his prisoner and abandon the treacherous hunters to their unspeakable fate, or stand and fight.


What’s more, the vampires have made him an enticing offer if he co-operates – they’ll save his dying wife by turning her into one of their kind. He can join her, and the devoted couple will live forever.
The jailhouse defenders are outnumbered and out of options. It’s a battle that can’t be won, certain slaughter for them all, and Anton can’t trust his scheming allies. But Lord Marshal Yoska isn’t about to surrender.


For he’s an experienced vampire hunter, a dangerous man when cornered, and a single minded warrior who knows there are worse things to fear than death…

Why it is a must-read?

It’s pacy, visceral and packed with twists and turns.

Here’s the trailer for Crimson Siege:

Thank you so much, Jay, for letting us get to know you a little bit better. Besides reading your books, I’d love to try one of your cakes one day!

Jay Raven‘s books and anthologies containing his stories can all be found on Amazon. Why not get your copy of Crimson Siege now!

Jay_Raven_Books_1

Jay_Raven_Books_2

You can follow Jay Raven via the following social media:

Email: jay@jayraven.com

Website: www.jayraven.com

Twitter: @JayRavenAuthor

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fantasywriterjayraven/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYpfhXi_m6ePYfeHG_MPO7A

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3153810.Jay_Raven

What To Watch? One of Us

This weekend we watched One of Us on Netflix. It’s short, but not sweet! A great way to spend an evening or two.

One of Us

One of Us Poster

Cast

There are several known actors in this series. The only person I immediately recognized was Joe Dempsie, who played Gendry in GoT. Kate Dickie, a Scottish actress, played Lysa Arryn in GoT and has a minor but important role in One of Us. I know Juliet Stevenson is an award-winning actress. The others are completely new to me. My favorite was Joanna Vanderham (another Scottish actress) as Claire Elliot. It’s nice to see new people on the screen and not say ‘hey, there’s so-and-so from such-and-such!’

Plot

The story is about two Scottish families, the Elliots and the Douglas-es, living on neighboring farms. They get united when the son of one family marries the daughter of the other family. Tragedy strikes when the newly-wed and expecting couple gets murdered in their Edinburgh home. The police soon finds out who committed the crime and try to find him. What they don’t know is that the culprit stole a car and drove to one of the farms where he crashes due to severe weather conditions. After the families take the wounded man inside, they find out he is the killer of the happy couple. The next morning, they find him murdered. One of them is the killer…

What I liked about One of Us

As mentioned before, I like to see new faces on the screen. It was strange to see Gendry in it as his character was completely different from the one he played in GoT. He played it very well, though. I liked it that the plot was unpredictable. Only at the very end did I guess it. There were also several side-stories going on, all very believable, which made it interesting from the beginning to the very end.

What I didn’t like about One of Us

The beginning was a bit slow. It took me the whole first episode to really get into it. At first, it seems like a normal ‘whodunnit,’ but then turns out to be so much more than that.

The people in this series obviously don’t often watch crime series on TV and have no idea about getting rid of evidence 🙂 .

Summary

One of Us is a nice, short (only four episodes) series about the darker side of people. Who can you trust? How far will you go? I’d recommend this for older teenagers and adults due to the subjects in it (violence, drug use, adultery, suicide, murder).

Meet The Author… Mark Tilbury

On the 20th of April, Caroline Maston organized an online interview with Mark Tilbury who just released a new book of his, The Key to Death’s Door. I was lucky to have time to attend. I didn’t know Mark’s book had a paranormal twist and now I can’t wait to have the time to read his books!

Mark Tilbury

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Can you remember the first book you ever read (or was read to you)?

I can’t actually remember, but it would have had to have been Enid Blyton or a Noddy story.

What did you read yourself as a child?

The Famous Five, and then Agatha Christie as I got older.

The Key to Deaths DoorWhat’s the best book you’ve ever read?

From the Corner of Eye by Dean Koontz. There’s a really evil antagonist who made me laugh out loud. You could say it inspires my bad guys!

What did you do before you became an author?

Computer repair! Glad to get out of it!

When did you decide to become a writer?

I’ve tried on and off my whole life and had a little interest, but it wasn’t until Kindle/Amazon made it possible to self-publish that I really decided to go for it.

Are you a full-time writer?

Yes, I’m very lucky that it is.

Do you have a writing routine?

I generally tend to write in the afternoons as I don’t seem able to write at any other time of day.

The Abbatoir of DreamsWhat are your main writing ambitions?

To write a story of the caliber of The Green Mile by Stephen King.

Tell us something about your work.

I’d describe my books as dark thrillers with a supernatural twist. Usually, there’s a protagonist against the most evil antagonist I can think up and ordinary people in extraordinary situations.

What is the most difficult part of writing for you?

The editing! The writing itself I get lost in, but the editing has to polish out all the mistakes.

Where do you get your ideas from and do you ever find yourself worrying about what goes on inside your head?

Yep. My head is a very worrying place to live at times! The starting point of my stories is normally with an antagonist speaking to me. King from The Liar’s Promise said ‘what doesn’t kill you will make you wish it had’ and that was interesting enough for my head to develop it. As for the stories, it’s normally a case of ‘what if’, e.g. in The Liar’s Promise what if a child remembered being murdered in a past life and the murderer being alive in this one.

How do you come up with the paranormal aspects of your book?

My imagination generally gets the better of me! I think of a ‘straight’ story and then it gets taken over by my strange imagination! I do have a very open mind on the supernatural due to things I’ve experienced, so maybe they’ve influenced me too.

Would you write in other genres?

Yes. I do intend to write some straight psychological thrillers soon, without the supernatural element.

The Eyes of the AccusedHow much research goes into one of your books?

I research as I go, but I always make sure I get my facts straight.

Have you ever killed off someone you don’t like in real life in one of your books?

No. Thankfully I’ve not known anyone in real life I’d like to kill, but there are a large number of politicians I wouldn’t mind getting rid of fictionally.

Do you watch horror and thriller movies and TV shows or is it only written work for you?

I’ve got all of the Stephen King adaptations on DVD, and I also enjoy things like Trial and Retribution, Cracker and Prime Suspect (I have the box sets!).

If you could write with any other author living or dead, who would you choose?

Mark Edwards. I’ve just finished reading The Magpies and was blown away by it. It’s an amazing read, and kind of where I’d like my books to go in the future.

The Revelation RoomHow important is social media to you as an author?

Very! It enables me to talk to people who both have read, and who may read my books. I love the interaction with everyone online and all the various ways I can keep in touch with everyone.

Do your daughters read your books?

Yes, they both read them. The Liar’s Promise scared the bejeezus out of Danielle, my youngest one (21yrs old). I sometimes what they think of me when they read them!

With what book should new readers start if they’re interested in your work?

The Abattoir of Dreams. It does contain scenes of abuse so not for everyone, but is ultimately about good overcoming evil, friendship, and trust.

How do you unwind at the end of the day?

By watching things that make me laugh.

It was very nice to chat with Mark and find out he is a very nice, normal person (who just thinks up twisted stories 😀 )!

Mark Tilbury’s books (including the audiobook The Liar’s Promise) are all available on Amazon, with his latest one being The Key to Death’s Door.

Mark_Tilbury_Books

What To Watch? Safe

The other day we began watching the short series ‘Safe’ on Netflix. It is a murder mystery of only eight episodes long, but boy, is it binge-watch-worthy!

Safe

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Cast

The most notable actor of the series is Michael C. Hall, the man who also played the serial killer Dexter, now in the role of surgeon Tom Delaney. He’s lost some weight and has acquired an English accent, but performs the same great acting we’re used to. Less humoristic, more serious, still extremely entertaining.

There are multiple other actors and actresses that play an important role, but I’ll mention two of them. One is his buddy Pete Mayfield, played by Marc Warren, and Detective Sergeant Sophie Mason, played by Amanda Abbington, playing Tom’s girlfriend. Both played their roles splendidly!

Plot

The series follows Tom as he’s looking for his missing daughter and spans consecutive days in a gated community in England. Every single episode begins with a flashback to the evening when things go wrong. Parents have an anniversary and go out for a weekend, daughter throws a party, and a dead body ends up in the pool. The dead body happens to be the boyfriend of Tom’s daughter, who goes missing from that moment on. This should be enough to make you want to watch Safe already 😀 .

What I liked about Safe

I liked seeing Michael C. Hall again (who, I believe, is the executive producer of the series). Dexter was one of my favorite series, and I got used to seeing his cute face. In Safe, however, he is much more serious, showing off his acting talent.

The best part of the series is the plot. It keeps being driven forward. You keep wanting to watch the next episode to find out what happens next. There are so many red herrings! You keep on guessing who did it… and you keep being wrong.

What I didn’t like about Safe

There honestly isn’t much I didn’t like. Maybe it was strange to hear Michael C. Hall talk English instead of American, but I got used to it pretty quickly. The final plot wasn’t far-fetched and very believable, just very unexpected. The whole series was very well thought through.

Summary

I would recommend Safe being watched by teenagers and adults alike. It is real-world stuff. People make stupid choices, getting others hurt, without the blink of an eye. It’s got a good ‘moral-of-the-story’ of ‘don’t do drugs.’

Cover Reveal!

As you may have noticed on social media, this weekend was my cover reveal! I’m afraid I hadn’t posted on my website as I was too busy promoting on Amazon, Kobo, my bookstore, One Stop Fiction, and Facebook. I had arranged a BargainBooksy ad this Sunday, not realizing it was Mother’s Day in the rest of the world (we had it in March in the UK). I always seem to coincide my releases with another worldly happening 😀 .

But, I won’t keep you in suspense any longer. Here are the new book covers:

Releasing A Vampire

Living Like A Vampire

Raising A Vampire Killing A Vampire

What do you think? Are they cool or what? I’ve still got to tweak them for the print version of my books, as well as make the spine and backs, but the pressure is off now I know what they’re supposed to look like 😀 . I’m back into my routine and will be blogging again. Missed it so much.

PS: They’re still on sale, but only for today!

An Update…

Hi everybody,

I just wanted to let you know that I’m still here. I’m working 24/7 to get my new book covers ready. It’s hard work, and Photoshop isn’t always doing what I want it to do. I’m persevering, though!

In the meantime, everything is on hold. I feel I can’t write when I have such an important job to finish. To let you get an idea of what I’m working on, here’s a snippet…

NewSuckersCoversDraftReveal.jpg

What To Watch? Rampage

Yesterday, we decided on a whim to go to the cinema again. The only option we had, with our daughter in tow, was Rampage, a science fiction monster movie. We were not disappointed.

Rampage

Rampage_2

Cast

The main character, and probably the main reason why people go and watch this movie as you know it’s going to be a good one, is Dwayne Johnson. He plays primatologist David Okoye, working at San Diego wildlife preserve. During his anti-poaching unit days, he rescued albino gorilla George and raised him, teaching him sign language. Okoye happens to have a special forces background (very handy).

Naomie Harris plays his side-kick, Dr. Kate Caldwell, the scientist who knows everything that is going on. Another major player is the cowboy OGA (Other Government Agency) agent Harvey Russell, played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan. The bad guy in the movie is a woman, CEO of Energyne Claire Wyden, played by Malin Åkerman.

Plot

Energyne has done some experiments in space that are too terrible to perform on earth. Unfortunately, things go amiss, and the space station blows up. Amidst the debris that falls to the earth are three samples of the experiment which change the DNA of the three animals that come into contact with them: George the gorilla, a wild wolf, and a crocodile. They grow out of control and get very aggressive. Claire sends out a signal from the top of the company’s building, luring the genetically modified animals to the city. She hopes that the animals kill Dr. Caldwell and so prevent her from spilling the beans on the terrible things Energyne has done.

What I liked about Rampage

Rampage is a good old-fashioned humoristic action movie, up there with 2012, San Andreas, and Godzilla. Having Dwayne Johnson in there is a big attraction although I was a bit disappointed he didn’t show off his pecs bounce 😀 . The humor is funny, sometimes predictable, but well spaced.

Rampage_3.jpgThe CG is spectacular. George is almost human with very life-like facial expressions. The people who have put their minds together to come up with the changes of the wolf and crocodile have been extremely creative. There was one revelation that made my jaw drop. They missed out on some opportunity for George, though.

What I didn’t like about Rampage

There were an awful lot of ‘WTF?’ moments in this movie. At one point, a whole building wall falls over while Johnson jumps out of the window (several stories high), yet there is not a scratch on him. Bullets don’t seem to hurt him either. Those are the little moments that take you out of the otherwise spectacular action scenes. But, as I already stated, the movie needs to be taken with a grain of salt.

Summary

Rampage is a fun movie that can be watched by teenaged children (there’s one graphic sexual innuendo at the end) and any lover of huge monsters. It is 107 minutes of fun, spectacular action, and awesome CG.

Rampage_1

New Facebook Page

I have been struggling to keep my personal and professional life separate on Facebook. I had created a Facebook Shop page to this effect, but it wasn’t working as I wanted to. I couldn’t share posts from authors I had befriended on my personal page to my shop page. I also didn’t actually want to reply to these author posts with my personal profile.

Today I learned that I could change all this by setting up a professional profile page on Facebook. So that’s what I did. Now I can chat, laugh, and share all things writing related on my professional page. My personal friends have the choice if they want to follow my professional page or not. How cool is that? (Australian rhetorical question 😀 ).

So, please like and follow my professional page on Facebook:

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I hope to see you all there!

Tenses – An Overview

In the weeks to come, I will address tenses as part of my grammar blog on Fridays. To most English-bred writers, tenses come naturally, but not to writers to whom English is a foreign language.

A few writers write in the present tense, but most prefer the past tense as it gives more options to describe what is happening. I myself prefer the past tense. Sometimes, however, I find that a simple present tense sneakily slips in. Hence, I love my beta-readers, and I edit and edit and edit…

Overview

Tenses in language are used for time reference. There are many different constructions for time reference and not all languages use the same one. Basic tenses have a past, a present, and a future. Some languages have a past and a non-past (which is both the present and the future), while other languages have a future and non-future (which is the past and the present). Some languages don’t weave time into their verbs at all. Some languages differentiate near and remote pasts or near and remote futures.

The TAM system

The English language uses the ‘TAM’ system; the Tense-Aspect-Mood system.

Verbs mark in what tense the action is happening: the past, present, or future (the tense proper).

The aspect shows if the action is happening (continuous), is completed before another action (perfect), is an action that had been ongoing but is completed at a certain point (perfect continuous), or is an action that is just stated (simple).

The four moods are:

  • indicative (assertion, denial, question of actuality, or strong probability)
  • imperative (request, direct order, permission, and strong suggestion)
  • conditional (if sentences, hypothetical results, reporting dialogue, polite speech)
  • subjunctive (desires, wishes, assumptions).

The indicative is the most used mood form in the English language.

English is a Germanic language that has a past and a present (non-past) and these tenses are formed morphologically (the tense is created with the verb only). The future tense is made with auxiliaries, i.e. it is made of the same non-past tense with a supplementary supporting word (will or shall).

The table below may help you understand.

Tenses
Morphological With auxiliaries
Present Past Future
 

 

 

Aspects

 

Simple

 

I work I worked I will work
 

Continuous

 

I am working I was working I will be working
 

Perfect

 

I have worked I had worked I will have worked
 

Perfect continuous

 

I have been working I had been working I will have been working

Tenses in verbs are a large subject in the English language. Therefore I will limit the forms in the posts to come to regular verbs and the examples to positive sentence structures (no negatives or questions). I won’t go into abbreviations either.

For the following explanation of the tenses, please note that the root of a verb is the base form of a verb (= whole verb minus –ing).

Example: working – verb root = work

An overview of posts to come

Past

  • Simple Past
  • Past Continuous
  • Past Perfect
  • Past Perfect Continuous

Present

  • Simple Present
  • Present Continuous
  • Present Perfect
  • Present Perfect Continuous

Future

  • Simple Future
  • Future Continuous
  • Future Perfect
  • Future Perfect Continuous

 

Timeline Graph

Tenses_Graph

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_tense#English

http://www.whitesmoke.com/tense-aspect-mood/

https://www.grammarly.com/blog/simple-present/

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/verbs

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbtenseintro.html

http://www.ef.co.uk/english-resources/

https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar

http://www.whitesmoke.com/tense-aspect-mood

http://www.ef.com/english-resources/english-grammar/verbs/

Follow me on a journey of words

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