Tag Archives: Vampires

Meet the Author… Jodi Ann Fahey

I met Jodi on Twitter. Her Casey Blane vampire book covers are beautiful and her book content enticing. Hence, I wanted you, my dear fantasy lover, to meet her too.

Jodi Ann Fahey

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Biography

Jodi Fahey studied journalism from the time she was in high school. When she attended Fashion Institute of Technology, she was able to branch out into the world of advertising. It was in that field that Jodi learned Graphic Design as well as film production and photography, both as a model and a photographer. Jodi’s articles on local businesses and events were published in local papers.

Jodi is a freelance web designer and ad developer. Her work has been published in European Homes and Gardens as well as BiBi Magazine. Also, she has done freelance work on Poetry Bay Online Poetry Magazine and Long Island Quarterly.

Utilizing all of her learned skills, Jodi has started her newest venture, the Casey Blane series. Jodi not only writes her stories, but she also designs her own covers, creates her own trailers, and designs all her ads. She also created her own website.

What made you want to become a writer?

I’d always loved to write and have been able to do a large range of projects. My first was a poem A Desolate Beach when I was fourteen. It was created for a submission in the Reflections contest in school and won. That was my first and only attempt at poetry, but it did spark an interest in writing for me.

After that, I was able to study journalism in high school. When I moved onto college, I took photography, and learned graphics, even modelled, too. All paved the way to what I do today.

Since High school, I’ve done ads, interviews, self-help, and instructional how-to articles. It wasn’t until I had my children that I even though of taking on a project as grand as the Casey Blane Series.

My son was really the one that awoke the writing bug in me. He was in kindergarten and was given a project of writing a short story. His teacher explained it as needing a beginning, middle, and an end. Well, my son being the intelligent child he was, and still is, challenged that theory. So, his story was:

There once was a horse named Kyle. He went to the top of the hill. Nothing happened. By Kyle Fahey

Needless to say, I received a call from his teacher that same day.

So that night, I told him about the use of his crayons by bringing out our hefty, six inch thick, Webster Dictionary, and explained to him that his story was a great start, but we have so many more words available to us, and they all want to be used. I opened that dictionary and told them that each of the words in the book are a writer’s crayon that a writer uses to make the story more colorful.  And a writer can write about anything.

Kyle, being Kyle, challenged me by saying, “Well, you can’t write about shoes!”

I laughed and right on the spot, I told him a story about a boy and his wet shoes. That story is currently being illustrated as we speak and my son has named it My Wet Shoes.

Jodi Ann Fahey_Letorian DescendantsAt that time, Kyle was not at all pleased by that and decided he wanted to stump me with a spatula, from which, The Killer Spatula was born. It’s a short tale, and one we use during camping, but that spatula comes out at Boy Scout events, even today.

A few years after that, my daughter had a very traumatic event happen to her and a friend of hers. Sadly, it was what cost her friend her life. Bullying is a horribly dangerous thing and the scars from it we carry throughout our lives. I wanted to help her and always said to her that you can’t change them, only yourself and how you view them. If you believe in yourself, their words hold no meaning. Power is within us. That was the inspiration to the Casey Blane Series.

What do you love most about the writing process?

That is a very good question, Jacky. I would have to say being able to create a world, a vision, in my reader’s mind. I think that’s an art in itself.  The process to achieve that, though not a simple one, I do find the most enjoyable. My characters are given a life way before the first word of the book was put to paper. I have characters that go back four hundred years and some that only came on in this lifetime. What that did, was it gave each and every one of them a voice and I feel that you can actually read it and hear them as they speak because of that detail.

Is being a writer a gift or a curse?

I believe both. Being able to write is definitely a gift and one that I fully enjoy. However, since I did start the series, I can’t tell you how many times I have woken up in the middle of the night with an idea or a thought and just stayed up the entire night writing. So, the lack of sleep from a midnight thought is one thing a writer will tell you is definitely a curse of the art.

What does your typical writing day look like? How many hours a day do you write?

As a very intelligent man once told me, Beem Weeks is his name, I am a writer with a day job.  I do work full time and put in almost sixty hours a week, just there alone. I am a mother of two, in addition, so my days are specifically planned out to accommodate all things. So, after my day, children are fed, house cleaned, and Facebook takeovers are done, and I am off to writing, I give myself at least fifteen minutes a day to write. Though, I can tell you, I think that has happened only once. Most of the time I write well into the night and fall asleep on my work.

Pen or typewriter or computer?

My first draft is done in pen. I can’t tell you how many of my pages have pen blobs from falling asleep with my pen in my hand.

I do have a funny story to share about that, too. I organize my chapters, so that each notebook is one single chapter. It worked out wonderfully for the first book. However, for the second, Lucian Sword, I ran into a small issue. On just one chapter, Chapter 22 to be exact, I had lost the notebook for. So, I rewrote it, went back to editing on the first book, picked up the second again to transfer it into my computer, only to find that chapter went missing once again. That happened four times.

Well, as it turned out, it was a good thing. I took it as a sign that the chapter needed to go in a different direction and, boy, did it ever. It happens to be one of my favorite scenes in the series thus far.

Do you write alone or in public?

Jodi Ann Fahey_Lucian SwordI do enjoy writing alone. My favorite spot to write is sitting on the arbor overlooking the Long Island Sound in a small local park by me. I love to hear the call of the Red Tailed Hawk that has nested there for years, and the sound of the waves below me. That’s on a nice day. Otherwise, I’m in my office corner, a corner of my bedroom that I made my own spot.

Music or silence?

Oh, definitely music. My favorite groups that I find inspiring are Thirty Seconds to Mars, Florence and the Machine, Muse, Evanescence, Imagine Dragons, Within Temptation, Linkin Park, and Mute Math, to name a few.

Do you outline or just write?

Outline. Definitely. I need to know the flow of the books prior to starting them. Don’t get me wrong, it does change as it goes, but at least I have a direction. I also have a timeline, a family tree, and a bible of facts for this series. As you read it, you will see why these were necessary.

What genre do you consider your book(s)? Have you considered writing in another genre?

The Casey Blane series is a Young Adult Paranormal Romance mixed with Action Adventure. I like to write movement and feeling, so my style does carry that element. I want the reader to feel the tension as they read it.

I have actually written other genres. I have just joined the Double DD group of writers (https://thedoubledd.com) created by Fredd Caroll and was given many wonderful opportunities there. I was given the opportunity to work with J Morgan Woodall with Lost Love Letters where I was able to expand to romance. Also, through them I was given the opportunity to do a Romantic Comedy through Genre Swap. In addition, I’ve been asked to do Live Writes and do have many wonderful opportunities to test out different genres there and work with great authors, like Steven Evans and Zorha Edwards, as well. I’m seeing a possible horror novel in the near future.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Another great question, Jacky. I did have to do research for this series. As I stated before, each character in the Casey Blane series has a story behind them. I did it that way, not only so that each character had depth to them, but because I wanted to have the possibility to go back into the story, as well. So the story doesn’t have to just be one angle, but many.

The second book, Lucian Sword required far more time to develop because it takes place in Northern Ireland and carries many tales of the land with it as the story moves forward. I wanted to make sure I had it perfect. So, that one did take seven years.

Thanks so much, Jodi, for sharing this with us. I love how your son made you become a writer. And I’m impressed with your research for your second novel taking seven years!

To let you know a bit more about Jodi Ann Fahey’s books here’s some more info:

Her first book, Letorian Descendants, was released December of 2016. In the fall of 2017, it was given the distinct honor and recognition by being named and awarded a finalist for the Book Excellence Award. In December of 2017, it was also awarded ‘one of the Most Memorable Reads of 2017’ by Stratford Living.

Jodi’s second book, Lucian Sword, was released November of 2017, and was immediately made ‘Book of the Month’ by Rave Review Book Club for the month of January.

Her third book, Dragon Lines, is set to release December of 2018, and Jodi is also part of two anthologies scheduled to release in 2019, so stay tuned!

Ways to connect with Jodi Ann Fahey:

Facebook Author page

Facebook group 

Twitter

YouTube

MeWe

Goodreads

Tumblr

Website

Instagram

All Authors

Amazon

Cover Reveal!

As you may have noticed on social media, this weekend was my cover reveal! I’m afraid I hadn’t posted on my website as I was too busy promoting on Amazon, Kobo, my bookstore, One Stop Fiction, and Facebook. I had arranged a BargainBooksy ad this Sunday, not realizing it was Mother’s Day in the rest of the world (we had it in March in the UK). I always seem to coincide my releases with another worldly happening 😀 .

But, I won’t keep you in suspense any longer. Here are the new book covers:

Releasing A Vampire

Living Like A Vampire

Raising A Vampire Killing A Vampire

What do you think? Are they cool or what? I’ve still got to tweak them for the print version of my books, as well as make the spine and backs, but the pressure is off now I know what they’re supposed to look like 😀 . I’m back into my routine and will be blogging again. Missed it so much.

PS: They’re still on sale, but only for today!

Great 5 Star Reviews!

I am so happy to receive reviews for my books. Today, I received two and they are both five star reviews. It’s hard to stay in my seat! 😀

This first one is from Ingrid for Book 1, Living Like A Vampire:

Ingrids_Review

The second is from Sandra for Book 3, Raising A Vampire:

Sandras_Review

Thank you so much, Ingrid and Sandy! You made my day!

via GIPHY

What To Watch? Dylan Dog: Dead of Night

Yesterday we watched Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (2011), a golden oldie, again. It wasn’t as ‘golden’ as I remembered, but it was good fun anyway. It’s a quirky look on the paranormal, and I’m all for quirky 🙂

Dylan Dog: Dead of Night

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Cast

Taye Diggs as vampire Vargas
Taye Diggs as vampire Vargas

Dylan Dog is played by Brandon Routh, and it’s not surprising he played Superman in Superman Returns (2006). He has the chin, the body, and the overall looks for it. Dylan’s sidekick, Marcus, is played by Sam Huntington who, to my surprise, also features in Superman Returns (I’ve got to watch that one again, now). The love interest, Elizabeth Ryan, is played by Anita Briem who has featured in Journey to the Center of the EarthDr. Who, and The Tudors.

The main villain, Vargas, is played by Taye Diggs, an actor who has been nominated for and won many awards. Another character with an important role is Peter Stormare, who plays Gabriel the werewolf. I like him. He has an extensive list of filmography but usually doesn’t play the main character.

Plot

Dylan Dog used to be a detective for the paranormal creatures of this world (‘no pulse, no problem’ was on his business card), but since the death of his girlfriend, is now retired. This changes when his buddy Marcus is attacked by a super zombie and is turned into a zombie. Dylan now wants to know why Elizabeth Ryan’s father has been murdered, where this super zombie came from, and why they’re trying to keep him from taking the case. Together, the three go out to seek the truth, dealing with werewolves, vampires, and zombies on their quest.

Marcus is being told he's a zombie
Marcus is being told he’s a zombie

What I liked about Dylan Dog: Dead of Night

Obviously, it’s great to see another movie about paranormal creatures that is not doom and gloom. This is a funny movie with the role of Marcus the funniest. He gets killed and turned into a zombie sort of in the first chapter. From that moment on and continuing for the whole movie, Marcus has to come to terms with the whole ‘being undead’ thing. His dialogue and acting are hilarious and worth the watch.

The creature Belial, who features at the end of the movie, is well done and not too fake (although he does look like he’s wearing huge boots).

What I didn’t like about Dylan Dog: Dead of Night

Dylan_Dog_Beliar.jpgI won’t lie. The acting is bad. I tried to figure out why as all these actors have an extensive list of experience. The only thing I could come up with is that the dialogue is often cliche and/or unnatural.

Summary

Dylan Dog is a fun watch if you haven’t got anything else lined up.

Dylan Dog: Dead of Night is available on Amazon.

 

 

 

Killing A Vampire is ON SALE!

For three days only, Killing A Vampire is for sale on Amazon for $0.99! Grab your copy before the price goes up!

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Living Like A Vampire

  1. 9Just in case you don’t have anything to read during the Halloween Holidays…

Living Like A Vampire is on sale 28-31 October 2017 and available on Amazon and KOBO.

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Chapter 1

On Friday night, October 15th, 2004, Sue, Charlie and I, three new teachers at Bullsbrook high school, sat in The Celtic Frog, the local bar. We occupied the corner booth that we had made our own since we had arrived in town two months ago. The bar was the only place that appeared to continue as usual since the start of the sucker pandemic a week ago. The bar owners, a couple called Abby and René, still served drinks and the usual patrons hung off the bar or sat in their usual seats.

There were, however, a large number of new customers. They were refugees escaping the city. The first ones arrived six days ago, but their number had steadily grown. In the beginning we didn’t think anything of it, just an unusual time of the year to get vacationers. As the news reports became increasingly scary, more and more arrived and today the biggest wave hit. Their conversations were hushed and anxious. We could hear snippets of horror stories about people being chased, herded, and slaughtered like cattle. We, too, sat huddled in our corner booth, whispering, discussing what to do next.

All of a sudden, we heard a commotion. I had heard a man talk loudly minutes before, but now people shrieked and cried. The three of us raised our heads to find out what was happening and I could see a cluster of people had gathered around one of the newcomers.

“They’re watching a camcorder,” Sue said.

I pushed her to move as I wanted to know what was on the camcorder that would make people cry like that. “Come on,” I said, “get going. I want to see it too.”

She stood up, followed on her heels by me. Charlie got up as well and followed us to the wailing people.

“What’s up?” I asked.

“Oh my god,” said Abby. She wiped tears from her face with one hand as she grabbed my shoulder with the other. “You’ll have to see it to believe it.”

She pushed me to the front of the crowd. An old man, I guessed in his sixties with a rather saggy build and a haunted look on his face, was holding a camcorder with its viewing screen out. More people tried to see the recording, but the ones who had already seen it were reluctant to move. They apparently needed to see the footage for a second time to convince themselves that what they had seen wasn’t a figment of their imagination. The old man backed up the recording and restarted it. What I saw scared the hell out of me.

It started off with a younger couple in a happy pose at a restaurant. The camera was then handed, I presumed by a waitress, to the man of the couple.  He continued filming the woman. It must have been her birthday or some other celebration as the man gave her a present and, after a big hug to the man, she began unwrapping it. I couldn’t hear what was being said.

From that one scene of happiness, it turned into one of chaos and slaughter. Suckers stormed into the restaurant, their fangs clearly visible, grabbing customers and waiters alike. The lucky lady who had been unwrapping the present screamed when one of the suckers grabbed her arm and tried to pull her away. She struggled. The camera movement became erratic, as if it was being used to hit the attacker of the woman. I saw the arm of the sucker move in the direction of what I think was the camera man’s neck. The camera then followed the movements of the man’s hand as he fought to get the arm off himself. You could see the sucker laugh, he actually laughed, before pulling the woman he was still holding in front of him. Her eyes were glazed over, she was in shock. The sucker then sank his teeth into her neck, watching the man as he did it. The camera movements became more erratic as the sucker dropped the woman and turned his efforts to the man holding the camera. We couldn’t see what happened next as in the struggle the camera was launched and landed on one of the other tables, in a plate full of pasta. Over the top of spaghetti, I saw the people in the restaurant become the dish of the day.

“Where did you say you found the camera?” someone in the crowd asked.

“Two days ago in Needham, halfway down the road to Portland,” said the old man loudly. “I was looking for food and found it lying there, in the pasta. Nobody but dead bodies there anymore, the suckers had already left.”

“Why didn’t you stay there? How’d you get past the suckers?” someone else asked.

“With a big, fast car,” he replied. “I was lucky to have missed the sucker attack, working in my cellar and my hearing being bad, but my wife didn’t survive.” There were tears in his eyes now. “I’ve come to warn you. I’ve lost my reason to live, but you still have a chance to save yours. I want people to know what’s coming for them. Y’all have to get outta here! They’re coming!” His voice was thick with emotion, his eyes wild, as he frantically looked around at the gathered crowd.

I glanced over my shoulder at Sue, then at Charlie standing beside me. They seemed as shocked as I was. More questions were called out to the old man, but I wasn’t interested in them. I’d heard enough. We returned to our corner booth, too traumatized by the images to speak for a while.

School had been suspended until further notice earlier that day and we didn’t have to worry about teaching. Most people had taken their children out of Bullsbrook during the past week anyway. So far the threat had seemed far away and we all thought it would be dealt with before it spread. These people and these images told a different story. It wasn’t going to be safe here for much longer.

“We have to get away,” I said. “We have a better chance of survival if we get away from the crowd.”

“Are you sure? Wouldn’t it be better if we stayed here?” Sue’s dreadlocks bounced as she spoke. She shifted in her seat.

I scanned the bar’s customers. “You saw the tape.”

So many new faces. So much fear.

“I think,” Sue said, her southern accent thicker than usual, “that we have a better chance if we stand with the people from the town. More manpower.”

My eyes went back to Sue. I let her words sink in and pursed my lips.

“I don’t agree. What do you think Charlie?”

Sue and I both turned to look at Charlie. Being a dwarf didn’t diminish his presence and, being ten years our senior, I gave his vote more weight. The low lighting cast dark shadows on his face, accentuating his dark mood.

“I agree with Kate. Even if all the people in town worked together, we could never stand up to the numbers that the suckers must have gathered by now. Let the army take that fight. We need to get out of here and hide until this is dealt with by the authorities.”

I followed Charlie’s stare and waited for Sue to respond. Finally, she nodded, dreadlocks bouncing again.

“You sure?”

“Yeah, he’s right. Better to hide than to fight.”

“Okay, so where do we go?” Charlie asked.

I put my lips on my thumb as I’d bitten too much skin off next to my nail while I was listening to Charlie. It was bleeding. I shut my eyes to deal with the pain and the image of my parents and sisters flashed by. I still didn’t know their fate. Last night I’d hardly slept, being tormented by nightmares of possibilities, and the resulting tiredness didn’t make me think any clearer. There was nothing I could do for them at the moment, so I tried to concentrate on deciding where to go. Even though Charlie, Sue and I had lived in Bullsbrook for over two months, we still didn’t know the town or the surrounding area well.

“Hey, maybe we can go to the campground!” Sue burst out. Charlie and I raised our eyebrows at her.

How in heaven’s name does she know a campground? She’s not what you call ‘the camping type.’

“I’d asked around about where to find an affordable place for my parents to stay. They want to come and visit me over the Christmas break,” she explained.  “My neighbors told me about it. They said it’s along the river north of town. It has cabins for rent at reasonable prices and a small cabin could easily sleep the three of us.”

My face lit up. “That’s a great idea. They might have a camp store too, with long-lasting food supplies.”

My thoughts drifted to movies with underground fallout bunkers. God only knew how long this sucker pandemic was going to last. When my attention came back to the conversation, I realized both Sue and Charlie didn’t comment on my practicality. They were too excited about the campsite.

“Yeah. Best of all it’s off the main roads,” Charlie said, staring into his own private universe while rubbing the stubble on his chin. Then his eyes snapped back to us. “We better go there as soon as possible. We probably aren’t the only ones who came up with the idea.”

“Are we going right now or tomorrow morning?” Sue asked. She shifted in her seat again.

I hadn’t thought that far ahead yet. A surge of fear gripped me. It was as if a giant hand squeezed my insides, pushing adrenaline into the far corners of my body. This was really happening and it wasn’t a figment of my imagination. The idea of leaving Bullsbrook, my beautiful new hometown, made the whole dreadful situation so much more real. However, Sue’s question was pressing and a decision had to be made.

“I’d sleep better if we left tonight,” I said.

Charlie slammed his hands flat on the table, making Sue and I jump.

“Okay,” he said. “Let’s go home, pack our stuff and meet at Kate’s. She’s the only one with a car.” He stared us down until we both agreed. “And only pack the essentials!” he added as he leaned toward Sue. I turned my head to see Sue’s reaction.

“What?” she asked innocently, shifting her eyes from Charlie to me, seeking back-up against his insinuation.

“Don’t get carried away, Sue,” I said. “My car may have five doors, but that doesn’t mean there’s a lot of space in the trunk.”

Sue opened her mouth in protest but couldn’t find a good excuse. Charlie chuckled.

The two of them hurried to finish their beers while I left mine untouched since I was going to be the driver. We paid our bill and went on our way.

Living Like A Vampire is available on Amazon and KOBO. Don’t forget it’s on sale 28-31 October! Only $0.99-£0.99!

Why vampires would have a population problem

I accidentally came across this article on the Short Sharp Science website. For your convenience, I have pasted the text here. I think the funniest part is the reactions to the article, which can be found on the website. I like Paul W.’s answer: think of bacon!

Enjoy!

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(PS: this graph doesn’t go with the article, but is from the article by The Gospel of Mac and is called ‘On the sustainability of a Vampire Population.’ Also a good read 🙂 )

by Michael Marshall, reporter

Maths blog Punk Rock Operations Research points out a major problem with the notion of vampires, which believers in our bloodsucking cousins would do well to note.

Assuming vampires are effectively immortal, and that they can reproduce by turning normal humans into vampires, their population would explode. So in the imagined worlds in which they exist, what prevents them from over-running the planet?

Colleagues in the New Scientist office suggest that there must be a high death rate caused by Slayers and other natural hazards, balancing out the high “birth” rate or mortals converted by bites. Such a mechanism could be modeled using the classic Lotka-Volterra equations for predator-prey populations. Although, of course, vampires are capable of making prey out of their supposed predators.

However, I think a more plausible explanation is the tendency for vampires to involve themselves in doomed love affairs with slightly dotty young women, causing them to spend centuries mooning around in crypts not getting much done. An extreme case of this was recently documented in a dumb emo teen movie.

This would mean that new vampires were only produced at a very low rate, allowing the population to remain fairly stable.

Empirical evidence to distinguish between those two hypotheses would be welcomed. Or perhaps you can suggest your own theory.

 

Header image: Dark Horse Comics

Everything You Expect From A Vampire Book!

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I just found out I have another review for Raising A Vampire! This time the reviewer is from closer to home (Aberdeenshire). Boris must have seen my add on a local Facebook page 🙂 . Here’s what he said:

4.0 out of 5 stars Bloodsucking, romance and betrayal

“Set a few years after the first book, Kate and Charlie’s daughter Sue is now 8 years old but looks twice that age. Sue’s true nature is revealed when she defends her mother from an attack. Soon they find themselves held prisoner in a facility especially designed for suckers. There’s bloodsucking, romance and betrayal: in short everything you would expect from a vampire book.”

Glad you enjoyed it, Boris, and thank you so much for the review!

What If I Tell You Vampires Really Do Exist?

Genetic mutation turns people into real-life ‘vampires’

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You can read it all in this article by Lizzy Parry that I saved in my Flipboard magazine.

The vampire stories There exists a gene mutation that blisters people’s skin when they go out in sunlight. This is caused by a condition, called erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) which prevents them from making heme/haem (the component of haemoglobin responsible for binding oxygen), which also makes them anemic and hence lethargic and pale.

In the olden days, they combatted the disease with drinking blood and only going out at night, which probably led to the vampire myth.

The disease still exists.

Vampires live on.

My Book is NOW FREE on Amazon!