Meet the Author… Mark Fowler

I chatted with Mark Fowler the other day. Read up on how he became a writer, what he has written, what motivates him, and what he has in store for us.

I know Mark Fowler from the One Stop Fiction Authors’ Resource Facebook site. We’ve been acquainted for two years now. Mark has been so lucky as to have his books published by Bloodhound Books and is doing pretty well, promoting his fourth book, Red Is The Colour, at the moment. I had the pleasure to chat with him yesterday evening through an author chat organized by Caroline Maston.

Mark L. Fowler

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What made you become a writer?

Possibly because I wasn’t any good at most other things in life! I love telling stories, making things up, indulging my imagination but in a way that communicates a truth to my readers. When I feel I have something to say, I write fiction, and I try to get to the heart of things the best way I can. 

Tell us a little about your work.

So far, I have published four novels: Coffin Maker (which took nearly twenty years to write!), The Man Upstairs, Silver, and Red Is The Colour. My books are all very different, and Coffin Maker, for example, does not clearly fit into any single genre, though it contains strong elements of gothic fiction and very dark humour. Red Is The Colour, on the other hand, is clearly a detective mystery thriller. The Man Upstairs is also a detective mystery, but with a twist of the very strange. While Silver can be read as a psychological thriller or as a gothic thriller. It is also very satirical regarding the publishing trade. 

Why do you write crime?

Crime is only part of it for me. There is crime at the heart of my books, though I would like to think that I’m also trying to explore what makes people tick, why people behave in certain ways in certain situations. I love the psychology of human behaviour. And the darkest crimes-murder for example-raise so many questions. We want to know what forms the heart of a monster or why an ordinary man or woman could carry out the most seemingly depraved acts on another human being. I also enjoy reading crime, of course, and many of my favourite authors write in the crime genres. 

What sparked your interest in the supernatural/gothic horror?

I’ve loved horror since the seventies when I used to stay up late Fridays to watch Hammer House of Horror. having said that, there are very few horror novels/films that I really love, whereas there are countless crime and mystery books and films. For me, many of the finest horror writers go beyond genre and are not constrained by it, for example, Ray Bradbury.

What do you find the easiest and hardest parts of writing a book?

For me, it’s starting a book that is the hardest part. Going off in the right direction, beginning at the right place. Once I get the opening right and the momentum starts to develop, I’m okay. I’m learning to plot a little before I set off as I always fear I may run up a dead end. Easier on the nerves having a basic plan, though to over plot from the beginning would kill the book off for me before it got started.

How much research goes into your novels?

I confess to not really being much of a researcher. Coffin Maker and The Man Upstairs were perfect for me, as I could make absolutely everything up. With Red Is The Colour, I gave myself a break by using a local setting, an area that I know extremely well and could write about confidently. However, there was the matter of police procedure, of course. I don’t particularly enjoy reading dense procedurals, and so I steered clear of getting too bogged down, but I did ask a police officer I know to help me with some of the details and to ensure that I wasn’t making any glaring errors. She was very helpful. 

What do you do in between writing books?

Read books! And listen to music and watch films, mainly.

What have you got lined up for us?

I have a follow up to Red Is The Colour written and two psychological thrillers also completed, not to mention three YA books that I would dearly love to find a suitable publisher for. I can’t stop writing them! I’m taking some time though to consider my options before moving forward with my next publication and will keep you posted.

I wish Mark success in the promotion of Red Is The Colour. Mark’s book Silver is on sale for £0.99 at the moment, so why not grab that one as well while it’s hot!

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Mark L. Fowler’s books can be found on Amazon and Bloodhound Books.

 

Book Review: Death on a Dirty Afternoon, by Colin Garrow

Death on a Dirty Afternoon

I had already read one book by Garrow, called ‘The Hounds of Hellerby Hall.’ I liked it so much, I decided to read another.

‘Death on a Dirty Afternoon’ is the story of Terry Bell, a taxi driver, who finds his friend Frank dead on his dining table. Together with Carol, the taxi company’s secretary, he tries to find out who did it. More murder happens, more mayhem.

The first thing you need to know is that Terry and the other characters talk with a Geordie accent. Even though I have never talked to someone with a Geordie accent, never been to the area, I found it easy to follow and it set the scene beautifully. Garrow does a great job setting scenes and building characters. You can just imagine yourself watching it all happen in front of your eyes.

The story is told by Terry himself and the insights to his thoughts are at times comical yet so humane. His relationship with Carol is one of the subplots that was interesting to follow. The tension builds up quickly and only goes up from there. What happens in the story is thrilling but on a realistic level. These characters are made of flesh and blood and there is no Hollywood-style over-the-top action. All of it could be true. There is no gore or sex in it (no matter how much Terry wants it :P), but it does have adult themes. The way Garrow describes it I think it is suitable for 16 and up.  This is a story that you will want to read to the end. You’ll never suspect the twist.

Thumbs up to Colin Garrow to come up with such a witty, funny cabbie-turned-sleuth. I imagine plenty of interesting stories to follow and I can’t wait to read them.

You can find Garrow’s books here.

With a little help from my friends…

Where would we be without a little help from our friends?

I’ve got to say it, I’ve joined the Fiction Authors’ Resource Group (#FARG) on Facebook recently and it was the best move I have made in a long time! The authors in the group are so helpful and always available. We are all indie authors, helping each other and trying to make our books visible to people, struggling for reviews and working against the cheaters who, somehow, get their books on No.1 without any reviews at all!

Thanks to them I now have a better chance of my books being visible on Amazon, via Facebook and Twitter. As a thank you I promised to share their books with you. Most of them are crime thrillers and great ones too! I will give you five books per blog until I run out. Have your pick…

Shut up and drive, by L M Krier http://amzn.to/1SbabO5

Altered Life, by Keith Dixon http://authl.it/13l (this one is FREE!)

A Barrow Boy’s Cadenza, by Pete Adams http://amzn.to/1QnlvkC

In the Shadows, by Tara Lyons

hyperurl.co/f43zem (audiobook), hyperurl.co/yctrszhyperurl.co/tkyb44

Murder on the Levels, by Frances Evesham  myBook.to/MurderontheLevels