3 5-Star Reviews for ‘Releasing A Vampire’!

Three 5-Star Reviews for
'Releasing A Vampire'!

Five Stars

I was pleasantly surprised to see three reviews for the Prequel of the Suckers trilogy, Releasing A Vampire! Here they are:

Reviews for Releasing A Vampire

I can’t say it often enough; I love seeing reviews, especially if they’re 5-star reviews! Yet, these three reviews are so different. I love it how they have been worded. You have no idea how much my heart jumps with joy to know my hard work hasn’t been for nothing. Thank you so very much, Sandy, Carl, and Shane. You made my day!

Emoji Kiss

Meet the Author… AEM

Meet the Author... AEM

AEM is the pen name of Amy Miller, mother of four and creator of magical realms. I like Amy a lot because she has a practical side and doesn’t like laundry either. And she writes about dragons. Did I tell you I like dragons? 😀 Let’s find out more about Amy’s books. They’re magical!

AEM

AEM

Biography

Amy Miller, who uses the nickname AEM to sign her books, is the author of the Endeavor Series and other random literature. While it’s rumored that she’s a homeschooling mama of 4 and wife of some dude who works with computers, most of the time she’s spotted with her nose in a book or clicking away on a laptop. Her main fantasy series, based in Oklahoma, blends old and new magical creatures and themes. Because seriously, the kind of bra worn while riding a dragon is important, ya’ll. Currently she’s working on book 5, Fervent Desolation.

Could you tell us a bit about your most recent book?

My Endeavor Series books, Phoenix Incandescent, Malignant Transfiguration, Apex Transcendence, Opalescent Immersion, and more to come, are about magic in the U.S.A. I wanted to bring the magic I experienced in children’s books to adult books. The first book introduces the magical world I’ve imagined, and is based in my home state, Oklahoma. Afterwards, the books hop about the United States and tell the stories of varies types of magical creatures.

The most recent book in my series, Fervent Desolation, is in the final round of getting ready to be released. The entire series is a reverse fairy tale, so it starts out with light and goes darker as the books go along. Book 5 is a turning point in the 9 book arc (there will be stand alones afterwards because as a reader I always want to know what happens after!). My main heroine, Charlotte, faces a new battle and makes a hard choice that will impact her for the rest of her life.

What’s the strangest thing you have ever had to research online for your book?

For my latest book, I needed to know how long it took for a character to bleed out from an injury in a specific spot so I could have a good idea of how to pace the paragraphs. I’m still waiting for a search engine just for writers. Please and Thank You. 

Do you have any difficulty writing characters of the opposite sex?

Nope, but I’m an odd gal, and I have a desire to have all kinds of guys and gals in my books. I always felt left out as a person, and so it’s my goal in literature to have guys who are tender hearted, for example, as well as guys who are rocks. And then there are guys who are various mixtures of both. I’m the same way with the gals. I don’t think that the only way to be a tough female is to feel close to nothing. I love girls who can wear a dress and wield a weapon, cry about it later, and still get up and fight again.

What would the main character in your book have to say about you?

I’m hoping she wouldn’t talk about that time I locked her and most of the rest of the cast up in the castle attic while I made plans for the future of the series. She hasn’t quite forgiven me for my choices, and she kinda took it out on one of the other characters when she found out what we had done. Not that he didn’t deserve it…

What character in your book are you least likely to get along with?

My primary villain. He’s a manipulator and I really can’t stand when people harm other people through manipulation.

What did you edit out of this book?

All the stuff that I thought was brilliant when I wrote it, and then realized that there wasn’t room for it in the story line, or that it really didn’t contribute to the story line, or that it was a bit more garbage than brilliance. But that’s okay. Generally the pain of editing is nothing compared to the awesomeness of the stuff I write when I rewrite. I’m a huge fan of rewriting.

Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

I have details in my books that probably nobody cares about but me. For example, when I have a dwarf den, I decorate it with plants and animals from the region of the United States in which it is located. I love those kind of details. I don’t know if they matter to the readers or not, but it’s my geeky fun. There are also some secrets hanging about in my books, but I don’t know how hidden they are.

If you had to write yourself as a villain, what kind of villain would you be? What would you be named?

I actually think it would be interesting to have a villain named Amy. Amy is generally not a good villain name, and that’s why it would be great. I would be all the things I’m not in real life. Gorgeous and mean and I’d have all the cutting remarks to reply with. And a boat. I’d have a villainous boat and a villainous bikini. And henchmen. Hunky henchmen.

Speaking of, I actually have a short story on my website about a villain. It’s called the Overlord, and I had a blast writing it. Maybe I’ll expand it someday! Here’s a link to the short stories I’m writing on my blog to practice my writing skills: https://magicalworldweb.wordpress.com/random-literature/

What did you find most useful in learning to write? What was least useful or most destructive?

I found that writing was the best way to learn to write. I’m a slow burn kind of writer, getting better as I go. The least useful thing for me was to read books about writing.  Of course, I had written four or five books by the time I tried that, so most of the lessons I had already learned. (I still read those books now and then to pick up new skills and learn new things.) The most destructive thing about learning to write was feeling like I had to fit some kind of mold to be a writer. In the end, I just was and I just did, and that’s how my story went. 

How do author friends help you become a better writer?

I cannot brag enough on my author friends. When I didn’t have author friends, I was terribly lonely. Now I know I’m not alone or weird and I have people I can ask for advice. Author friends have been where you’ve been, and can be a huge emotional support in the weak moments. Everybody needs somebody to tell them to Chin Up now and then, and I’m grateful for the writers in my life. Thank you! 

Bat

Thank you so much, Amy, for sharing with us about your books, the character in your books, and about your writing experience. I totally agree that it is awesome to have writer friends. They understand us and help us through the tough times. 

You can contact/follow Amy on the following social media:

Email: magicalworldweb@gmail.com

Twitter: @magicalworldweb

Instagram: magical_world_web

Website: https://magicalworldweb.wordpress.com

Facebook Page: @endeavorbookseries @BooksandArtbyAmy

Pinterest: @magicalworldweb

AEM’s books are all available on Amazon:

Bat

Meet the Author… Sherry Leclerc

Meet the Author… Sherry Leclerc

She is an author of speculative fiction. The reason I contacted Sherry, however, was because her book cover had a dragon on it. I love dragons. I’m a big fan of Anne McAffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series and have been a sucker for anything dragon ever since. So, I wanted to know more about Sherry and her books. I found out her second book actually has dragon shifters in it, and she’s planning to write a paranormal romance. Awesome! Here’s her interview.

Sherry Leclerc

Author Sherry Leclerc

Author Biography

Sherry Leclerc is a science fiction and fantasy fanatic who lives in magical realms where swords and sorcery, action and adventure, seers, shifters and sorcerers abound. A teacher and mom by day, and an avid reader and writer by night, Sherry has a B.A. in Language and Literature, and a B.Ed.

What is your favorite childhood book, and why?

My parents had a big book of fairy tales that they would read to my sisters and me at night. Then as we got older I read it again myself—numerous times. I don’t remember what the book was called, but I remember some of the stories. My favorite story from the book was The Ugly Duckling. I was a shy kid, who never felt like I really fit in. I think that’s why the story resonated so strongly with me.

Then, in my teenaged years, I read the Lord of the Rings trilogy. It started as an Advanced English class requirement, but it soon turned into a passion. It’s what sparked my love for fantasy fiction.

Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?

I don’t really remember a time when I wasn’t writing something, but the first short stories I wrote were a collection of three horror stories to try and scare my friends and family with at Halloween. I even drew some basic illustrations for the cover. They were paranormal stories with ghosts, spirits and poltergeists. They were handwritten on lined paper and stapled together into a booklet.

Who is your favorite author? How much is your work influenced by their work?

I have a few “favorite” authors, but the one who has influenced me the most is J.R.R. Tolkien. I remember having a difficult time getting into The Fellowship of the Ring when I first read it. There was so much back story and detail that the beginning felt slow-paced. Once the real action started in the book, I was glad for all the information that had come before as it made the story that much richer. By the time I finished the book, I was hooked on LOTR and fantasy fiction. I think I’ve read most of what he’s written since then.

Tolkien’s work made me realize that writing fantasy can be difficult and time consuming, but it can also be freeing. With fantasy, you are limited only by the depth of your imagination. The idea of being able to create a world and characters that feel real to the readers, that draw them in and allow them to connect with them, is both my goal and my inspiration in writing speculative fiction.

Have you read anything that has made you feel differently about fiction?

 I have read many books over the years that have shaped and changed how I feel about fiction. Most recently, it was Stephen King’s On Writing. Part memoire, part instructional book, it contained a lot of useful information and gave me much food for thought.

If you were deserted on an island, which three people would you want to have with you? Why? 

One fictional character from your book: I would probably choose Maelona from my first book, The Guardians of Eastgate. She is a seer, a warrior and a hunter, and she has some knowledge of healing.

One fictional character from any other book: For a fictional character from another book, it would be a toss up between Dumbledore from the Harry Potter books and Gandalf from the Lord of the Rings. They are both wise and are very powerful wizards.

One famous person who is not a family member or friend: I think I would choose Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. He is hard-working, motivating and inspirational. He’s funny and always seems to be smiling. He is also very strong, so he’d be helpful for all the manual labor that would need to be done, like building a treehouse like the one that was on The Swiss Family Robinson.

What are your books about? Can you tell us about your most recent book and why it is a must-read?

I currently have two self-published books available. They are The Guardians of Eastgate and The Dragon Shifters at Southgate, books 1 and 2 of the Seers Series, respectively.

The series is about a race of people, the Seers, who have been getting visions about an evil sorcerer who wants to take over the realm. There are four Seer Champions, each one named a guardian of a certain kingdom and its keystone. They must travel to the kingdom they are responsible for to try and protect that keystone, which is the first line of defense against the dark sorcerer. Along the way, they recruit others to stand with them in protecting the realm.

In book 2, my most recently published book, Seer Champion Talwyn must protect the kingdom of Southgate and its keystone. Along the way, she tries to recruit a group of reclusive Dragon Shifters to help her.

Aside from the entertainment factor, I try to tackle issues I myself feel strongly about in real life. For example, I try to make gender a non-issue in my books to in order to promote gender equality. There is also the idea of accepting others for who they are and seeing the benefit in welcoming differences between people as a way of strengthening the whole.

What genre do you consider your books? Have you considered writing in another genre?

My current two books are epic fantasy with love story sub-plots. I’ve also started a second epic fantasy series. I consider myself a speculative fiction author because I have plans to write a sci-fi book and a paranormal romance. I’ve also considered writing contemporary romance, but if I do that I will likely use a pseudonym.

Do you have any difficulty writing characters of the opposite sex?

I don’t have much difficulty in writing male characters when they are secondary characters, probably because I’ve always been a bit of a tomboy. However, I do have some difficulty when a male is the MC and I have to delve deeper into how they think and what makes them tick. I try to read a lot of novels written by men or with men as the MC to help me in this area.

What motivated you to become an indie author? How did you break into publishing?

A big part of my choice to publish independently is due to desire to have complete creative control over these stories that mean so much to me.

For my first published book, I used an assisted self-publishing service to help me. I had to do a lot of research to find an honest company that has the authors’ interests at heart. I did this because I had no clue about the process. I learned a lot from that experience, and for the second edition of that same book, I took more control, finding and hiring people myself to do the cover, editing and formatting. For the second book, I ran into a couple of speed bumps with people I hired, but in the end I took on more of the work than in the past, only hiring a cover artist and editor and taking care of the rest myself.

I had a huge learning curve, and had to do a lot of reading, online courses and workshops in order to learn the process, but I’ve enjoyed it very much and I plan to keep on learning and publishing.

What do your fans mean to you?

Since I write the kinds of stories I myself would like to read, I consider my fans to be kindred spirits. I started writing and publishing to make a life-long dream of mine come true. Hearing from fans—heck, even having fans—and knowing there are people out there who have read and re-read my work and loved it, means more to me than I would have thought. They are the driving force that motivate me to keep going during moments of self-doubt and times of difficulty. I don’t feel like I need a huge, adoring fan base. I’d be happy to have even just a few people who seem to get me and my work.

Bat

Thank you so much, Sherry, for sharing all this with us. You have been very modest not to mention that your first book, The Guardians of Eastgate, has won a Golden Literary Titan Book Award last year. Only books that have unique writing, vivid worlds, complex characters, and original ideas get these awards, so I take my hat off to you! 

If you want to contact Sherry Leclerc or follow her on social media, you can do so via the following:

Email: sherry@sherryleclerc.com

Website: www.sherryleclerc.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/sleclercauthor

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SherryLeclercAuthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sherryleclercauthor/

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Sherry-Leclerc/e/B0787V2JPJ/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

Bat

Meet the Author… Laura Daleo

Meet the Author... Laura Daleo

I haven’t met Laura Daleo, but I like her already. She loves vampires, furry creatures, and even has been so bold to start her own publishing company! Laura has written four vampire novels. Let’s find out about Laura and her books. 

Laura Daleo

Biography

Laura Daleo was born and raised in San Diego, California, where she majored in Fine Arts at Mesa College. She is best known for her love of animals and shares her home with three humorous Basset Hounds, Stuart, Morgan, and Dexter, her toughest critics. Laura has held positions in several industries, restaurant, telecom, biotech, research, and retail. Throughout Laura’s professional career, she furthered her writing skills by taking courses and by joining writers’ critique groups and Writers Digest. She is now the owner of Story Bound Publishing, a fresh voice in the supernatural realm of ebooks and traditional print, committed to publishing unearhtly tales of aliens, angels, demons, fairies, ghosts, shifters, vampires, werewolves, witches, zombies, and all other creatures that go bump in the night. 

What is the biggest surprise you experienced after becoming a writer?

When I started submitting queries for my vampire book, Immortal Kiss, to agents and publishers, the feedback I received was they had no interest in another vampire book. Twilight was big at that time which I would have thought would drive up the need for more vampire books, yet agents and publishers said the opposite. In my opinion vampires will never go out of style. I did find one publisher who was interested and offered me a contract.

Who is your favorite author?

Anne Rice is my favorite author. Her book, The Interview With The Vampire, in my opinion changed how the world perceived the vampire. Her character, Lestat, is one of my favorite vampires of all time. When I’d finished the 4th book in her vampire chronicles, the 5th book wasn’t due out for a year. I couldn’t wait and the anticipation led me to create my own vampire series, Immortal Kiss.

Music or silence?

I like to listen to music to get ideas, but then turn it off once I start to write.

What is your favorite genre and why?

I enjoy dark fantasy and urban fantasy. I love a creature perceived as evil, yet they are given a vulnerable side which makes you care about them.

The Vow by Laura Daleo

Can you give us an interesting fun fact about your book?

I took an Egyptian myth and used a variation of it to create how vampirism began.

Are you working on another book? Can you give us a small teaser?

I’m working on my 5th book, The Soul Collector. It’s my first non-vampire tale. Here is a teaser:

As I lay trapped inside this quiet realm, 
my soul adrift, my body earthbound,
a magical book guards my flight,
though will it keep me safe till morning’s light.

What do your plans for future projects include?

My future projects are two more books in my Immoral Kiss series, The Ten and The Old Ones, and then a standalone book, The Doll.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

My first two books were published by a small press publisher. I felt that I didn’t have the creative freedom with covers, editing, and the time frame it took to publish. Once my contracts were up, I began publishing my own books. I’m very happy I made that decision. My writing has grown so much since then.

Do you do book tours, and if yes, what’s your experience?

Yes, I love book tours. It’s great exposure. You do have to do your research, though. Not all book tour services have a great organizer behind them.

Do you send out a newsletter, and if yes, what’s your experience?

I do send out a newsletter. I do a monthly giveaway for my subscribers and I think that keeps them happy.

Bat

Thanks so much, Laura, for letting us get to know about you, your writing, and your experience in the publishing world. It’s hard to get heard (or rather ‘read’). Good advice about book tours!

You can follow Lauro via the following social media:

email: laura.d.daleo@gmail.com

Website: https://www.lauradaleobooks.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorLauraDaleo/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AutLauraDaleo

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/author_laura_daleo/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13162897.Laura_Daleo

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Laura-Daleo/e/B00WP8F514

All Laura’s books are available on Amazon

Bat

Giveaways!

Giveaways!

It’s been a while, but I have ‘Releasing A Vampire’ now into BookFunnel promos. This means I can offer you these fantastic giveaways again 🙂 . Check them out! When you click on them, it’ll take you to the website.

Another Happy Reader!

I received a message from a happy reader of the vampire paranormal romance novels, the Suckers Trilogy!

Another Happy Reader!

Message from Jolanda

I just received this message on FB from an Australian friend of mine. She read all the three books in the Suckers Trilogy; Living Like A VampireRaising A Vampire, and Killing A Vampire, and loved them!

Made. My. Day!

Have you read the Suckers Trilogy yet? Get yours now on

Amazon, Nook, or Kobo!

Meet the Author… Georgia C Mathers

Read my interview with paranormal, Australian author Georgia Carter Mathers.

Meet the Author... Georgia C Mathers

I met Georgia Carter Mathers on Twitter, and we had some brief email correspondence. I can’t believe we have so much in common! She’s also Australian but writes in US English, writes paranormal romances, spent most of her youth in her room reading… The list goes on :D.

Unfortunately, she didn’t have the time for a proper interview as she’s working on publishing seven books at the moment. I have no idea how she is so organized (the one thing we don’t have in common!). She was very kind to direct me to her website, though, and I found some online interviews with her which gave me plenty of information for ‘the interview.’ Let’s meet my fellow country-woman, Toowoomba-based, Georgia.

Georgia Carter Mathers

Georgia Carter Mathers

Biography

Georgia is a busy writer, editor, mom, and wife. She studies publishing, writing, and everything in between. Altogether, she holds an Associate Degree in Creative Writing from Southern Cross University, a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of New England, and a Graduate Certificate in Publishing at Sydney University. She is the author of The Devil Inside, Trelloran Seduction, and The Vampire’s Covenant.

How did you become an author?

As a teenager, I shut myself in my room and wrote stories, but I couldn’t show anyone. My family thought there was something wrong with me.

I remember one day, my mother kicked me out of the house and told me to go somewhere—anywhere—she told me I couldn’t stay in my room and write anymore. They were worried that I didn’t have any friends.

What genre do you write?

My main genre is romance. My first story from 2016, The Devil Inside, is a short paranormal romance. I published my first full novel, The Trelloran Seduction, in 2017. It is primarily a romantic fantasy story but has dark elements like our own world. My latest novel, The Vampire’s Covenant from 2018, is a pure paranormal romance. 

Why do you write?

I write paranormal romance to chase happiness. There is so much hate and misery in this world, and I want to show that love can conquer all.

Some of my stories talk about issues that feel insurmountable, but my stories always end with a happy ever after. That is the point. No problem is too big.

My stories are written about those who conquer it all, and I hope you find hope and happiness within my books.

What is the definition of paranormal romance to you?

Very simply, paranormal romance includes a romance between one or more paranormal characters. These novels often, but not always, include urban settings and a mystery or quest of some kind.

The romance and mystery plots may occupy equal page time, although this

The Vampire's Covenant

can vary from book to book. The romance can include all heat levels according to the intended audience. One could argue that the variables that exist in paranormal romances are identified through its sub-genres such as bear shifter romances, vampire romances or gods and angels.

Paranormal romance is distinct from urban fantasy. You’ll find that paranormal romances are constantly evolving. Many paranormal characters have multiple powers to shift or to use magic or as a seer for example. So, this represents an exploration of characters and an effort to push at the boundaries of the sub-genre.

Why do you write paranormal romance and not normal romance?

I write paranormal romance because the characters are more fun to write. I like the action and the suspense that comes with it too. I also write it because the characters could be described as monsters in some way. They are a mixture of things that both frighten and protect us. At the same time, these characters are very 

vulnerable and lonely. And I identify with that. I’ve always felt inherently different. This feeling describes a trope that is particularly strong in this sub-genre.

Did you set out to write a novel after 'The Devil Inside'?

Absolutely not. Trelloran Seduction started out as a poem, after a vision I had between being asleep and wakefulness, then became a novella. It took me two years in total for it to become a proper novel. 

What would be your advice for authors wanting to write in this genre?

I would say read widely in the sub-genre as well as outside of it, and find an editor who cares about your work.

I hope you enjoyed reading about Georgia Carter Mathers. She’s got a whole heap planned for 2019, so keep an eye out for her books! They are available on Amazon and her website

You can follow Georgia on FacebookTwitter, YouTube. and Goodreads. Why not join her Goodreads reader review group?

This is Georgia’s 2019 publishing schedule:

Dragon Addictions: Firebreathers, March 2019
Witch Matched, April 2019
The Making of a Goddess: The Miana Prophecy, June 2019
The Making of a Goddess: The Pantheon, August 2019
Dragon Addictions: Fire Investigation Unit, September 2019
Kait & Wes, October 2019
Dragon Addictions: Fire Prevention, December 2019

Bat

This post contains Amazon affiliate links. 

Love will find you!

Love will find you!

You can run, but you can’t hide… Love will always find you!

Kate tried to hide. She tried to run. Love still found her when she bumped into the handsome sucker called Caleb. But an apocalypse is not a good time to fall in love…

Read the interview with Jacky Dahlhaus by book blogger Kerry Parson to find out more about Jacky’s writing. Read Living Like A Vampire to find out about Kate’s love adventure.

#Paranormal #Romance #Suspense #Vampires

Meet the Author… Caroline Davis

Meet the Author... Caroline Davis

Meet the author

It’s been a while, but I’m back with some interesting author interviews again! I met Caroline Davis on Twitter. She has a book out called Night Vision: An Oupire Romance.  She is a vampire fiction writer who writes about ‘oupires.’ I actually had to google what oupires were as I’d never heard of the word. I read that vampires are mythological creatures, and oupires are the real thing, but it appears that Caroline has worked with completely different info. Let’s find out more about Caroline’s oupires!

Caroline Davis

Biography

I didn’t start out wanting to be a writer, although I became interested in vampires early on through the TV soap opera Dark Shadows. It was while I was at Fashion Institute of Technology in New York that I started writing down my vampire fantasies with another student there. After I left Fashion Institute to study fine art and then library science, I would try my hand at writing vampire stories now and again. To be honest, most of them were abysmal and best forgotten! I had better luck with my nonfiction efforts. An academic article I wrote on the reburial of Native American human remains in New England was published in a regional archaeology journal, a highlight of my academic library career. During my last few years in the library world, however, I finally found time to write fiction again, and so I began work on a story about (what else?) vampires.

What is your book about? 

I like to write about undead characters (vampires and oupires—I’ll explain) in situations where unresolved issues from their past come out. My novel Night Vision has what’s really a cold case murder mystery from 1913 mixed in with a love story. Undead characters are great for this kind of story because those involved in the crime are usually still around!

The difference between vampires and oupires in the book comes from the variety of characteristics ascribed to blood sucking revenants in folklore and literature. So, for example, the vampires are alive from sundown to sunrise, but the oupires are alive from noon to midnight, something which comes from certain eighteenth century accounts of Polish and Russian vampire activity. The two groups aren’t always at war, but there is a lot of friction between them and sometimes violence erupts. That possibility is always there, and it’s a problem for the two main characters in Night Vision, since the heroine, Lily Schmidt, is an oupire and her lover, Carl Eckhart, is a vampire.

How did you come up with the idea for Night Vision

As I mentioned in my bio, I got interested in vampires through Dark Shadows years ago but got involved in other things and only turned to writing on and off. However, during the vampire craze of the early 2000s, it happened that my father passed away. At his wake, I encountered a female cousin, someone of whom I was very jealous when I was a child. I started thinking about writing a vampire story about two cousins, but I didn’t want it to be just a simple novella about how they investigate this supposed “vampire murder” from 1913. So the murder became part of the backstory, and I expanded from there.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Well, I was a librarian so you can imagine that I spend a lot of time on research both in constructing a book and while I’m working on it. For example, in one scene in Night Vision the vampires play a card game, so I needed to find a game they would be likely to play. Eventually I figured out that since most of the characters in the scene are German, they might play a game called Skat. This led to my trying to learn how to play Skat, or at least understand enough of the game to realistically show it in the scene.

Are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I don’t want to write a series with the same characters appearing in multiple books because I like to catch a character at some sort of emotional turning point. Then I want to write about another character who is facing a different issue. However, I do intend to use the preternatural “world” that I established in Night Vision in other books, which might occasionally share a character or two. I also intend to keep the settings in the Northeastern U.S. (Night Vision is set is Pennsylvania) and to work with similar plots and themes going forward.

Do you outline or just write?

I make a detailed outline—the more detailed, the better—because I want to find a coherent way to present the backstory and the clues to the mystery. I also want to be sure that there is plausible motivation for whatever a given character will do that moves the plot forward. Of course, as I write I understand the characters better and then new ideas occur to me and some things get changed.

When you develop characters, do you already know who they are before you begin writing or do you let them develop as you go?

As I mentioned, I understand my characters better as I go along. But I do start with a fairly good idea of what the main characters are about, basically. It can happen that I understand a character’s psychology, but I’m not sure how to present the character, that I don’t have a clear idea of his or her “persona.” It’s difficult at first, but when I can hear a character talking in my head, I know I’m on the right track.

Do you have any difficulty writing characters of the opposite sex?

Frankly, yes. Although I believe that men and women share the same mental and emotional processes on a deep level, there are all kinds of subtle differences that make it challenging for me to portray someone who is not a heterosexual woman. Just to take a simple case—in my experience most men do not readily admit they are depressed. So, I can have a deeply depressed male character, and I doubt that he’s going to talk about it with a friend the way a female character might. A related problem is that many of my characters were born in the nineteenth century, sometimes abroad, but they have lived through the whole twentieth century into the twenty-first. I go on the assumption that they are not going to be the same people they were years ago, but they aren’t just like people now either. I struggle with these kinds of issues in my writing, but I’m not sure how successful I am in dealing with them.

Music or silence?

This is a fun question. Night Vision has a lot of music behind it, and I even describe a concert in the book. So, yes, I do listen to music much of the time when I am writing, although not always. To write some types of scenes, I need a sharp focus that is better achieved through silence.

Are you working on another book? 

Yes, I am writing another book, the working title of which is Blood and Water. The main character in this book, Jan Martínek, is a vampire who, under pressure from his estranged wife, reluctantly agrees to investigate the disappearance of his detested uncle Otakar. Jan holds a grudge against Otakar because, many years before, Otakar made him a vampire against his will and later forced him to marry his ex-wife. But when Jan goes to the old spa town in western New Jersey where Otakar was last seen, he encounters the beautiful descendent of a long-dead medium, a woman with whom he was in love in the late 1890s. Trouble ensues, as they say.

What motivated you to become an indie/published author? How did you break into publishing?

When I first finished Night Vision I tried sending it out to about a dozen agents and a few traditional romance publishers, but, as you would expect, no one was interested in it. It was a particularly bad time to send out a vampire love story because the market for such books was saturated by then, and I was an unknown author with no social media presence at all. So, I put the story aside and worked on the second book until last year, when I was able to retire.

At that point I decided to self-publish Night Vision on Amazon, which took a while as I had to learn to use Kindle Create and make a cover. I finally got the book out last November and since then I have been learning to use Twitter and connecting with other authors. That’s been a lot of fun! Now I’m glad I decided to go the indie route and plan to self-publish Blood and Water on Amazon when it’s finished later this year.

Thank you so much for your explanation of oupires, Caroline! Your story sounds very intriguing, and I hope to read it one day.  It’s a pleasure to have met you on Twitter 🙂

You can contact Caroline Davis via the following social media:

Email: cdavis1903@outlook.com

Twitter

Amazon Author Page

Bat

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Back to school

Would you go back to school?

Think about it. If the world was ending, would you go back to school?

 The world is in chaos. People are being chased and killed by vampires. What does Kate do? She goes back to school…

Listen to a podcast interview with Jacky Dahlhaus by Máire Brophy on the Irish Writers Podcast.  Read Living Like A Vampire to find out why Kate goes back to school…

#paranormal #vampire #suspense