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Meet The Author… – Terry Marchion

Meet the author

Today, I’m introducing to you… Terry Marchion. I met Terry online through One Stop Fiction. He is a lovely man who doesn’t mind going out of his way to help a fellow writer (he’s one of my beta-readers and my writing would be terrible without him). He has written three sci-fi novels about Christopher and his uncle Tremain, who live on a space colony called New Earth. Terry gives us a peek into his WIP, The Misplaced Mentor. It’s the fourth book in the Adventures of Tremain & Christopher series, so be sure to read all the way till the end :). But first, let’s get to know Mr. Marchion a bit better.

Terry Marchion


Interview with Terry Marchion

Are you a full-time writer?

Ok — I’m not a full-time writer — I do hold a day job, which sucks away a lot of my time – eventually, I’d love to write full-time, but I’m not there yet. I’ve always written – in one way or another, but I’ve never had the confidence to pursue it. When I was around 18 or so, I did submit a short story but was promptly rejected. That colored my dreams for quite a few years until 2016, when I submitted a pitch on a twitter event. I received a few replies of interest but was rejected then too – go figure. But, thinking that others could read AND like my work inspired me to go the indie route and do it all myself.

What do you like about writing?

I like the freedom writing gives me — it’s sometimes frustrating, but also very liberating. I’m satisfying my need to be creative and hopefully being entertaining at the same time.

What don’t you like about writing?

I don’t care for the politics around writing — I’ve come to like the process of writing and formatting and having others beta read — the rest is work. LOL — but I’m learning to embrace the work too.

Who should read your writing?

People should totally read my stuff if they like fun adventures with a sci-fi bent to them. Think the old serials of the 40’s — Buck Rogers, for instance, or the episodic tv shows we all watched like Lost in Space, Star Trek, Doctor Who — that’s the spirit this adventures series is written in.

What is the best thing you’ve learned about writing?

The best lesson I’ve learned is to be persistent and never to give up.

What is the worst thing you’ve learned about writing?

The hardest lesson I’ve learned is to be persistent and to never give up. I want it all NOW dammit!! LOL

Where do you write?

Where do I write? Everywhere! I don’t have a dedicated writing spot — I tend to feel constrained if I can only create in one place — I use a laptop or a tablet/keyboard combo or just a pen and paper to get my thoughts down. I eventually go solo on the laptop to put it all together. But at least I’m writing.

What is the most memorable sentence you’ve written?

I’ve yet to come up with a consistent writing schedule, but I’m working on that.I don’t have a memorable line yet, but I’m working on it. Hopefully, one of my characters will spout something I just can’t predict.

Thank you so much, Terry, for sharing this with us. I’m sure we all can do with that boost to never give up! They say great writers are the ones that don’t quit, so I clink my glass to you and will keep on writing!

Without further ado, here’s that special snipped I promised you from Terry’s fourth book, The Misplaced Mentor, which is to be released soon.

Preview of The Misplaced Mentor

Marjorie’s apartment sat in the middle of the city, just off from the bazaar. Tremain and Markus walked the short distance from the lab complex, past the flapping tents and awnings of the bazaar, down to the residential area, overlooking the coast. The austere building was built around a park, complete with park benches and walking paths. The pair walked up the stairs to Marjorie’s apartment in silence, the smell of stale air, cooked food and paint heavy in the corridor. Once outside the door, Tremain consulted his tablet.

“Well, you are right, it shows she’s inside. Well, at least her tablet is.”

“What if she’s injured . . . or worse?” Markus whispered.

Tremain turned to his friend.

“Have you regressed to a teenager again?” he scoffed, “you’re jumping to conclusions,” Tremain gestured to the door. “after you.”

Markus knocked on the door. There was no answer. He gripped the door handle. It buzzed in answer. Naturally, it was locked.

“Oh, it’s a biometric lock. Only Marjorie can unlock it.”

Tremain nudged Markus aside.

“Or someone with a key,” he said as he pulled a device from his lab coat. He fit it around the handle and pushed a few buttons. In seconds, the lock clicked open, pinging in acceptance. “There, we’re in.”

“Tell me we didn’t just break the law,” Markus asked.

“Of course not, who do you think helped Marjorie design that lock? Naturally, I had a back door for emergencies.”

Markus sighed in relief.

“Good. I didn’t want the authorities called down on us.”

Tremain shook his head.

“Need I remind you that YOU are one of the authorities?”

Markus chuckled.

“I suppose you’re right. Come on, let’s go in.” He pushed the door open, ready to enter, but Tremain held him back.

“Hold on, let me look first.” He said as he pushed past his friend.

“Why? What do you think you’ll see?”

Tremain stood just inside the doorway, scanning the areas he could see. No bodies visible, so that was a positive.

“I’m just seeing if there is anything out of place.”

“You’ve been here recently?”

“No, I’ve never been here, but there’s a lot you can deduce from what you see initially,” Tremain stepped into the apartment, beckoning Markus to follow, “for instance, she’s not much into decorating, is she?” He gestured to the walls, which were bare, save for a few small pictures. The furniture was functional, but not cozy. The apartment’s front door opened into the living area of the apartment. Directly in front of them was a short hallway which led to the bedrooms and bathroom and off to the right was the kitchen.

Tremain and Markus stood in the center of the living room. The coffee table was littered with some papers and pamphlets. Markus walked through the kitchen to the bedrooms while Tremain leafed through the papers. He picked one at random and frowned when he looked at it. A photo of a plot of land appeared at the top, with a description of the property below it. At the very bottom was the agent’s details. The next few papers were the same, a piece of property, some large, some small, but all were offered by the same agent. He checked the dates.

All were printed at least six or more months ago. He scratched his head as he pulled up one of the pamphlets. A brochure about a construction company. Another was regarding refrigeration processes and equipment. Tremain’s frown deepened. Markus came from the bedrooms, shaking his head.

“She’s not here. I did find her tablet, on her bed. She didn’t want to be tracked down.”

Tremain showed him the real estate listings.

“She was looking at land all over the place. And,” he pointed at the various brochures, “she was building something,” He scratched his head again, “something secret. She didn’t want anyone knowing about it or we’d have heard.”

“So what does this all mean?” Markus grumbled, “Where is she?”

Tremain crossed his arms as he thought.

“She’s definitely not on one of her sabbaticals, that’s for certain,” He paced the room, “she’s consulted with an agent for land, so I think that’s where we go next.” He stopped pacing and slapped Markus on the arm. “A perfect job for a Senator. You find out where she bought land, and I’ll investigate these disturbances.”

Markus nodded and left on his mission.

Tremain lingered just a bit, glancing around the apartment. To be honest, it reminded him of his own. He spent more time in the lab than at home, so it made sense to keep it sparce. Even in her retirement, Marjorie hadn’t made her apartment more cozy, which implied she spent more time elsewhere. Something caught his eye. In the corner of the doorway was a scattering of dirt. He knew he and Markus hadn’t tracked anything in, so where did this come from? He knelt down and felt the dirt. It had a fine grain feel to it, almost like sand. He gave it a sniff, but couldn’t detect anything. The beach wasn’t that far, definitely in walking distance. She must have brought some sand in with her when she went for a walk. Filing that away for later, he locked up the apartment and headed back to the lab.

Terry Marchion’s Books

You can find all of Terry Marchion’s book on Amazon.

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My Weight Loss Journey – Week 3

My Weight Loss Journey

Week 3


I’m still going strong after twenty-one days! I lost weight, and I eat a lot better. I’m still struggling. I do. There are moments when I get incredibly hungry. I have cravings too. But I don’t give in. During these moments of temptation, I keep visualizing the body I want to have; lean and healthy. That keeps me going. It doesn’t mean I never eat when I’m hungry. What I do is, I eat a healthy snack like almonds and sunflower seeds (I must admit the latter are the cardboard version of all seeds).

This week, I’ve also begun a new yoga sequence. I had wanted to do this on Sunday, but I forgot, so I tried them out this morning. They are hard! My biggest problem is the Downward-Facing Dog (see the image for the pose. It always reminds me of Chuck from the Angry Birds movie 🙂 ). See, I have a hallux limitus. Hallux means toe and limitus refers to the range of motion. In other words; I can’t bend my big toe. It’s not the same as hallux rigidus, in which there is arthritis and the joint is painful. It’s only painful if I’ve been trying to bend it further than it can, like walking on high heels. It sucks (metaphorically, of course).

Downward-Facing Dog posedownwarddog_Angy-Birds.jpg

This wouldn’t be a problem if I could put my foot flat on the floor like in the image, but I also suffer from extremely short tendons. This means my ankles suffer the most from this problem. Walking uphill, in particular, is a struggle, causing cramps in my calf muscles as they are overstretched. You see my problem with this pose?


Enough whining. Here are my results for this week.


Not too much difference, apart from the near absence of shade on my belly. I do realize I should have worn the same bra in W0, oops. I also realize now that I may be holding my breath in the W3 shot (my boobs are higher). Next week, I’ll make sure I don’t.


From the side, there isn’t much difference to W2 at first glance. Have a look again at the images below and note the areas the arrows are pointing at.


The ‘apex’ of my belly has come down and is less pronounced, and the saggy bottom bit has disappeared! I’m most happy with that last item as I thought it was ugly. I hoped it was just my pants not sitting tight, but no, it really was my butt. But it’s gone now and I’m doing a happy dance 🙂 .


I stepped on the scales this morning (btw, did you realize that’s why I have a snake’s skin in my header?) and my weight was 76.2 kg (12 stone). I’m afraid I can’t do the comparison with my belt as I’m wearing pants sitting lower on my hips, giving a false reading.

My biggest struggle this week was deciding whether I want to go the keto diet route or the paleo diet route. Both have their attractions, both have their problems for me.

Going the keto diet way means no carbs. Not any. I can’t do that. They are reduced in my diet, big time, but to go without completely is impossible for me. I have a family to feed and they do want their rice and potatoes and pasta and wraps and don’t have time to prepare two separate meals types every day. I have had a look at the snacks and basically see triple bypass options, with hors d’oevres dripping with cheese and fatty meats. So that’s not going to happen.

Regarding the Paleo diet, I like the idea. Going back to your roots. But eating legumes is completely against the keto diet. They clash in that respect. Also, it means a lot of foods that my kids don’t like. I tried for my daughter to eat blueberries. Didn’t work. Not even when I put sugar on them. She just doesn’t like any berries, hot or cold (and no onions, no peppers, no egg, and my son doesn’t eat cheese or fish. They don’t leave me many options).

This means I have to go with the flow. I do my thing for breakfast and lunch, but dinners are a compromise.

Here are some of the things I’ve been eating this week:

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Next weekend, we’re celebrating my father-in-law’s eightiest birthday, big party. Dieting will be hard, so wish me luck!


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What To Watch? Grimm

What to Watch?

Guess what? I haven’t watched any movies this weekend! Not. One. Movie. That’s a very rare occasion. Why? Because I have been working my butt off on my WIP. This didn’t mean we didn’t watch any TV at all. We did watch Grimm, and The Bing Bang Theory.  We only discovered the latter recently. But never mind TBBT, here is my take on Grimm.



The Cast

Grimm is the story of a homicide detective, Nick Burkhardt (played by David Giuntoli), who suddenly can see people change their image into fairytale creatures, called Wesen, when they lose their composure. They can be anything from werewolves to snakes to birds. Nick’s auntie Marie informs him, just before she dies, he’s a Grimm, a person with this special seeing abillity who must keep the balance between humans and the Wesen. Other people can’t see the Wesen unless they are a Wesen too or when the Wesen want humans to see their true self.

Nick is not alone in his new duty. In the first episode, he befriends Monroe (played by Silas Weir Mitchell) who is a Blutbad, a Wesen like a werewolf. He is the comic relief in the series but plays a major role. Nick has a work partner, Hank Griffin (played by Russell Hornsby) and a girlfriend, Juliette Silverton (played by Bitsie Tulloch). Hank and Juliette don’t know Nick is a Grimm (at least, not at the start). Nick’s Captain, Sean Renard (Sasha Roiz) also plays a major role. I have to mention sergeant Drew Wu (played by Reggie Lee) as he, too, is very funny. His humor is more subtle than that of Monroe, though.

The Plot

Every episode, Nick needs to solve a murder mystery. Very coincidentally, most murders have a Wesen involved (surprise, surprise!). All sorts of creatures pass the screen and it’s fun to see their faces change when the Wesen are upset or die (and they revert back to their human form).

The second storyline mainly depicts Nick’s relationship with the others; Monroe (who is unwilling to help at first as Grimms usually are out to kill Wesen), and Hank and Juliette (who have no idea why their partner is acting so strange lately). In season two, Juliette plays a bigger role than in season one as she gets involved in the mysteries against her will.

In the background, there’s always the ‘bigger picture’ story involving Nick’s boss Renard and his involvement with a Hexenbiest, or witch, called Adalind Shade (played by Claire Coffee). Things are happening on a more international level with them.


I like the fact that this series is about a more mature cast, not teenagers for a change. Nick is in a steady relationship with Juliette, yet the series manages to incorporate some love issues here and there.

It always amazes me how they come up with yet another type of Wesen. The creators must have a very good imagination or a damn good book on mythology.

The secrecy and love plots make you want to watch the next episode and when you’ve done that, you want to see the next one. There are some really good cliffhangers.


There’s always some dislikes, of course. The graphics are not the greatest. Yes, I like the facial changes of the Wesen, but they can look really fake. The fact that only the head changes (well, most of the time) also seems like a rather cheap option.

Sometimes the plot is a bit predictable, but only sometimes.


We have binge-watching nights of Grimm, going through three or four episodes per night, depending on how much time we have. We’re only in season 2 yet, and there are six seasons in total, so we still have a fair amount to feast on. Bring on the Wesen!



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Quoth the Raven

Thoughts on Fantasy

This morning, I came across a blog about crows and ravens in fantasy, written by Nicola on her Thoughts on Fantasy blog. It an interesting text that informs you of the black birds’ characteristics, their appearance in symbolism and mythology, as well as their occurrence in fables, poems, and literature. She also talks about the roles ravens have in fantasy stories. Check it out at Crows and Ravens in Fantasy.

My Experience with Corvids

When I lived in Australia with friends of my mother, an elderly couple, the man used to go outside with a tray of raw minced meat every afternoon. One day, I asked him what he was doing with it. He told me to join him. We sat on a bench in his front garden, and two Australian magpies came up to him. He fed them the minced meat. He told me that every day, the birds would come and wait for him to feed them the minced meat. You can imagine how perplexed I was, about the fact the birds ate minced meat, the fact that they knew what time the man would come out every day, and, of course, the fact that the man fed them the meat.

In the hamlet where I currently reside, live a clamor of rooks. I could’ve said a parliament of rooks, or a building of rooks, the other collective nouns for the noisy, black birds (see this webpage for more collective nouns for birds), but they really do make a clamor. They live on the other side of the hamlet and I hope they stay there. I rather prefer hearing the soft chirping of the smaller passerine birds over the noisy rooks.

The sound of corvids I like best is that of the Australian magpie. They’re bigger than the European magpie and have a very typical song. Waking up in the Australian bush and hearing this (incredibly intelligent) bird warble is magical!

Header photo by Samuel Zeller on Unsplash

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Killing A Vampire – Ad Clip

Suckers Trilogy Books

I don’t think I’ve shown you my ad for Killing A Vampire yet. I’m pretty proud of it as I put it together by myself. Here it is.

I’m still working 24/7 on editing the book, but I assure you it will be out soon!

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Eat, Sleep, Write, Repeat – The Independent and Dependent Clauses

Today, I thought I’d rehash my post on commas but then realized you need to understand what dependent and independent clauses are first. When I read indie author’s work, I often find they don’t always know what the difference is. Hence, here is my old post from February 2016 again. I have updated it slightly and made sure all links are active (at least the ones mentioned in the text).

The Independent and Dependent Clauses

When I first read about ‘the clause’ I had to suppress a giggle. With no literary education apart from my high school English, the only clause I had ever heard of was, of course, Santa Clause. But as I read on, I realized how important the clause is, and I admit I have made many mistakes regarding this little-but-oh-so-important part of literature. I will try to give you a simplified explanation of ‘the clause’ and will start with the ‘independent clause’ vs. the ‘dependent clause.’

For those who don’t know (yet), the clause is the smallest way to make a sentence; it contains a subject and a verb. I walk. They sat. We read. These are all sentences made by a single clause. They contain a subject and a verb. You can have one or two clauses in a sentence and, if you’re wise with words, even more. Have a look at this 239-words sentence, it’s amazing! (You’ll have to search for it on this website, just enter ‘239 words sentence’ into the search function and follow the prompts).

Every sentence must have at least one (main) clause otherwise, you will have something called a fragment, which is, obviously, not a sentence.

Example of one clause: We drank a lot of wine. (We = subject; drank = verb)

Example of two clauses: We drank a lot of wine, and we danced all night. (We, we = subjects; drank, danced = verbs)

Example of three clauses: We drank a lot of wine, although I didn’t really like the vintage, and we danced all night. (We, I, we = subjects; drank, didn’t like, danced = verbs)

Example of a fragment: Drank a lot of wine. (? = subject; drank = verb; hence no clause)

Clauses can be independent or dependent/subordinate.

An independent clause can make a sentence on its own.

Example: We drank a lot of wine.

dependent/subordinate clause can’t stand on its own; it is dependent on an independent clause.

ExampleBecause we drank a lot of wine, we danced all night.

The underlined first clause in the above example is now a dependent clause as because we drank a lot of wine is not a proper sentence on its own; because of this, something happens, i.e. we danced all night. Because we danced all night can be a separate sentence on its own it is an independent clause. We drank a lot of wine would have been an independent clause, but because we added because to it, it isn’t any longer. It now is dependent on the independent clause we danced all night, and hence is now a depended clause. Confused yet?

Connecting independent clauses

You can connect two independent clauses in three ways;

  • with coordinating conjunctions. They are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so; or FANBOYS.
  • with a semicolon (;) or colon (:)
  • with a semicolon, a transition word, and a comma (Example: I like wine; however, I don’t like dry wines) (see this page for transition words like after, as although, unless, and more, too many to mention 🙂 , so check out this page)

Connecting a dependent clause to an independent clause

You can connect a dependent clause to an independent clause in two ways: by using a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun.

Subordinate conjunction

You use another type of conjunction to connect a dependent/subordinate clause to an independent clause; the subordinate conjunction (although, as, because, etc.). You can find a list of the most used subordinate conjunctions here.

You can start the sentence with the independent clause or with the dependent clause. If using the former, don’t use a comma to combine the two clauses. When using the latter, separate the two clauses with a comma. These two last sentences here are good examples of the latter sentence structure (dependent before independent clause).

Example of former: We danced all night because we drank a lot of wine. (dependent clause first, so no comma)

By the way, there is a fine line between transition words and conjunctions. Some words can even be used as both. Have a look at this page for further information.

Relative pronoun

Another way to connect a dependent clause to an independent clause is with a relative pronoun; that, which, whichever, who, whoever, whom, whomever, whose, and of which. These words take over the role of the subject in the dependent clause and integrate the conjunction word. Look at the next two examples.

Example 1: We drank a lot of wine, but the wine was horrible, and we danced all night.

Example 2: We drank a lot of wine, which was horrible, and we danced all night.

In the second example which takes the place of the conjunction but and the noun wine from the first example. which was horrible is not an independent clause, it is dependent on we drank a lot of wine and refers to the word wine.

Have a Wonderful Writing Week(end)!

Websites used to compile this text:
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Another Short Story – Rescue

Meldrum Writers Club

This week’s story didn’t have any keywords. During our meeting last week, we discussed how we can improve our sentences. We used the article titled ‘How to write better sentences’ by Daniel David Wallace. You can’t find the article online, though. I’m afraid you’ll have to sign up to get it here. I can assure you it’s worth it as it has very interesting information. Check it out and see how it can help improve your sentence structure.

Anyway, one of the topics in the article is about verb sentences vs. noun sentences. It stresses to use strong verbs to improve action in your sentences. So we set our homework to write a story about mermaids using verb sentences. It’s called ‘Rescue‘ and can be found in the short story section of the menu. It’s a typical mermaid story, nothing special, no unexpected twists or anything, but has a lot of verbs in it. Enjoy!

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Meet the Author… – Gordon Bickerstaff

Meet the author

This week’s author being featured is Gordon Bickerstaff. We met on Twitter. He tweets about me, and I retweet his tweets. It’s an uncomplicated relationship. We haven’t actually met although he also lives in Scotland (on the wet ‘n windy Westside, I rest my case). I’m sure we will one day, though, somewhere 🙂 .

Unfortunately, I’m still working like mad to finish the last installment of my trilogy, so I didn’t have the time to contact Gordon for a personal interview. I did find, however, a great interview with Gordon by Nonnie Jules from Rave Reviews Book Club (see link below) from two years ago. Gorden is currently the author of not three but five crime thrillers. The following text, written by Gordon on Gordon, can be found on Amazon.

Meet Gordon Bickerstaff

Gordon Bickerstaff

I was born and raised in Glasgow but spent my student years in Edinburgh. On summer vacations, I learned plumbing, garden maintenance, and I cut the grass in the Meadows. I learned some biochemistry and taught it for a while before I retired to write fiction. I do some aspects of DIY moderately well and other aspects not so well. I live with my wife in Scotland where corrupt academics, mystery, murder, and intrigue exists mostly in my mind. I have written the Gavin Shawlens series of thrillers: Deadly Secrets, Everything To Lose, The Black Fox, Toxic Minds and Tabula Rasa. More will come in due course. I enjoy walking in the hills, 60s & 70s music, reading and travel.

That’s Gordon in a nutshell. For those of you who’d like to know more about Mr. Bickerstaff, you can read all about him in the interview by Nonnie Jules from Rave Reviews Book Club.

Gordon Bickerstaff Books

Gordon’s books are all available on Amazon.

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My Weight Loss Journey – Week 2

My Weight Loss Journey

Week 2


I have good news and bad news for you this week. I’ll start with the bad news to get it out of the way and off my chest. I didn’t stick to the diet. Surprise! I knew this would happen, so I’m not so surprised myself. That it would happen so soon… yeah, I didn’t expect that. My dear friend Stephanie told me it is not a diet but a lifestyle change which means that habits need to be adjusted and this will take time. I’m all for that.

What did I eat that I shouldn’t have? Pizza, a hamburger, and an ice cream. Not too much, you’d think, but the results speak otherwise. I’m going to stick to the diet again this week.

I’ll let you in on a little secret. Ever since I stopped eating biscuits with my tea in the afternoon, my daughter has stopped eating them as well. She is copying my healthy diet (well, not everything, but at least the biscuits thing). In itself, that is good. What scares the hell out of me is that I’m literally influencing somebody else’s life. I guess that’s what parenting is all about, but what if she’s copying my bad habits too? Scary!

My yoga exercises are going great. I don’t have the tight shoulder muscles anymore and am contemplating moving on to the next set of exercises.


Not surprising, I didn’t lose a lot of weight this week. I was 76.9 kg (still 12.1 stone) this morning, so I lost 0.1 kg/0.02 stone. I’m still on the same notch on my belt (85.5 cm/33.7inch), but I am halfway to the next one which is encouraging. It’s an old, leather belt, so fingers crossed it doesn’t stretch anymore.


Even though I didn’t lose any substantial weight, I think I clearly lost some belly fat. Whether it moved up, I don’t know. Like I said, I’m trying to keep my belly in sort of halfway, but it’s hard to be 100% sure it’s the same every time.



Yep, still the same belly, but if you look at the next picture, you’ll see some progress.


I put the red line along the front line of my belly. It has certainly gone more vertical since Week 0 (the distance between the line and the front of my thighs is shorter now). This means that even without losing weight, my body is adjusting and losing fat.


Like I mentioned, I didn’t stick to the diet. I have been good in the fact that I didn’t snack unhealthily. The cravings were stronger than last week and I curbed them by eating walnuts. They are nice but have a bitter aftertaste which stops you from eating too much.

On Friday I treated my family (including myself) to home-made pizza. I thought it would be healthier than bought ones (it does make more mess). Maybe it was healthier, but the number of carbs was, of course, a shock to the system. I didn’t learn, and on Saturday, we had hamburgers, on a bun (those of you who follow me on Instagram already know 🙂 ). It was delicious, but again, my system that was starved the week before took in all the energy and stacked it all on my hips (or boobs, I’m not sure). I also ate an Orea icecream for dessert. One of my kids brought it from the kitchen for me (it’s very hard for them to adjust as well) and I kinda did them a favor by eating it so they didn’t have to put it back. I’m kind like that :). Did I enjoy it? I’m afraid not. It was awfully sweet and the cone was soggy. I’m going to stay away from the desserts again.

Here are some of the things I’ve been eating:

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There are three images of a dish I got from Pinterest: Avocado&Bacon&Egg breakfast dish. One of the images is the one from Pinterest. It looks scrumptious, doesn’t it? The other two are of my culinary attempt to recreate this. You have to scrape out the avocado, break an egg in it, put some bacon and cheese on top, and shove them into the oven for about 25 minutes. Sounds simple. Result: something that looks like ovaries after a cycle of IVF. Not very appetizing.

Next to this, my avocado was way to small to hold even 1 egg, so it spilled into the tray with ceramic baking beans and I had to clean them all, individually, by hand. To my horror, the avocado, which I normally love, tasted like mushy peas after being cooked to death. I can tell you this recipe is no longer on my favorite list.

I’m going to keep strong this coming week! Why? Because I so want to wear this jacket:


I bought it on eBay from Pixieknix last year (they don’t sell this one anymore though) and I love it. However, the sleeves are very narrow and my belly sticks out from under the zipper, so I really need to lose weight to look good in this!

Do you have any pieces of clothing that you want to wear when you’ve lost weight? Show me!

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What To Watch? Fracture

What to Watch?

This weekend, I watched four movies; Enemy Mine, Fracture, Patriot’s Day, and The Circle. Thinking back just now, only Enemy Mine sprung to mind without thinking too hard. This was probably because I had actually bought the DVD and had been looking forward to watching this classic (with Dennis Quaid) for a few days. As I want to share with you what you could watch right now, I’ve picked ‘Fracture’ to review this week.



This movie is from 2007, yet I had never heard of it before it was released on Netflix. The story is about a young and promising lawyer, Willy Beacham (Ryan Gosling) who, just before starting his new job in an uptown firm, takes on the ‘easy’ case of a man, Ted Crawford (Anthony Hopkins) who shot his wife and confessed to it. The case suddenly becomes a lot more complicated when Crawford, representing himself, accuses the investigating Lt. Rob Nunally (Billy Burke) of having had an affair with Crawford’s wife.

The Pros

No need to mention Hopkins portrays the complicated, manipulating Crawford very well. Ryan Gosling convincingly plays the cocky lawyer who thinks he can outsmart anybody. The cat and mouse game unfolds as the plot moves on. It’s very cleverly put together and keeps you on your toes. I love movies like this. This is not a typical Hollywood movie in which all the good guys survive, which is nice for a change. The music was appropriate, not taking you out of the movie at all. Makeup wasn’t anything special, but again, didn’t take you out of the story either. Special effects weren’t the gimmick of this movie as it is very much a court case flick, but the scene where the wife is shot is filmed convincingly.

The Cons

There wasn’t much I didn’t like about the movie. The twist at the end was expected  (it still is a Hollywood movie) although my knowledge of the law didn’t let me know it beforehand. Next to this, it always puts me off to see actors that have had major roles in other movies or series, like Billy Burke here, who played Bella’s father in the Twilight Saga. In his first contact with the police, Crawford says ‘Lots of vampires out there.’ It was a strange, out-of-context comment, and I wonder if it had anything to do with Burke’s previous role.

It’s a good movie to watch and I’d recommend it to anybody who loves court case movies or mind games.







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Eat, Sleep, Write, Repeat – Thesaurus

As I really do need to work on my book, I’m going to repeat old blogs on Fridays. I’ve got book reviews, movie reviews, grammar articles, etc. to chose from. Let me know what you prefer and I’ll accommodate your wishes 🙂 This first rehash is on using a thesaurus and is from February 2016.

Hug your friends, but love your thesaurus

Honestly, I don’t know what I’d be without a thesaurus. I don’t own one in book form, but I use any online thesaurus that can give me a description and/or synonyms of a word that I am trying to use in my writing. With English not being my first language, I have to make sure that whatever word I use is exactly what I want it to say. Say what you mean and mean what you say.

I thought I had written a pretty good story when I handed in my first novel to the proofreader. Little did I know. When I got it back it was filled with red words, most of them suggestions for using other words. My vocabulary was small and I fell into the trap of repetition. I learned a lot from the comments of my proofreader. I wrote them all down and go through the whole list whenever I have written something. Just to make sure I don’t repeat the same mistakes.

One of the biggest mistakes I made is repeatedly using the word ‘to get.’

I got up.

I got dressed.

I got the book.

I got his gest.

All of these are valid sentences. If you put them into a text, however, you will not be so happy with them.

I got up and got dressed. I got the book. I finally got his gest.

I got, I got, I got. Repetition. Boring! You probably could say it that way, but this is not what people want to read.

All these ‘gots’ actually have different meanings.

I got up – I rose, lifted myself off…, hoisted myself out of….

I got dressed – I put my clothes on.

I got the book – I grabbed/retrieved/picked up the book.

I got his gest – I understood his meaning.

To get up and to get dressed are probably okay to use as the ‘getting’ is part of the verb; to get dressed, to get up. But there are other ways to say it. If you use these different descriptions your writing will become not only more clear but also more of a pleasure to read.

I hoisted my body out of bed and put my clothes on. Once dressed, I picked up the book. I finally understood his meaning.

So much better.

Use a thesaurus!


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Another Short Story

Meldrum Writers Club

This week I had asked my daughter for some keywords. She didn’t make it easy. They were:

  • druid
  • frustration
  • Mount Everest
  • lampshade
  • mother

I postponed writing the story again and again until there was no time left. The story that appeared in my head is now titled ‘Contempt.’ You can find it in the Short Stories section of the menu. As always, it has a little twist at the end. Let me know what you think of it.


Header photo by Jan Kahánek on Unsplash